The aftermath of a perioperative death: who cares for the clinician?

Journal article


Rodger, D and Hartley, H (2018). The aftermath of a perioperative death: who cares for the clinician? Evidence-Based Nursing.
AuthorsRodger, D and Hartley, H
Abstract

Working in the perioperative environment entails exposure to traumatic and sometimes catastrophic events such as a perioperative death (PD). PD can be a uniquely devastating experience and has the potential to lead to long-term negative physical and psychological effects for the staff involved, especially when appropriate support is absent. In a number of practice settings, these destabilizing effects have been shown to detrimentally compromise individual and team performance.1 This is of particular concern in the perioperative setting, since deterioration of individual competence and subsequent team performance has been directly linked to poor patient outcomes. Despite numerous studies establishing this link, there has been little research exploring clinicians' experiences of PD and organisational support for front-line clinicians remains alarmingly inconsistent. The question remains, who is responsible to the clinician in the aftermath of a perioperative death?

KeywordsIntraoperative death; Perioperative death; Resilience; Second victim; Operating Department Practice; Operating room nursing; Wellbeing; Patient safety; Teamwork; Surgery; Anaesthesia; 1103 Clinical Sciences
Year2018
JournalEvidence-Based Nursing
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group
ISSN1468-9618
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1136/ebnurs-2018-103018
Publication dates
Print21 Nov 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Oct 2018
Accepted19 Oct 2018
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/868q1

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