Why a right to life rules out infanticide: A final reply to Räsänen

Journal article


Blackshaw, B and Rodger, D (2019). Why a right to life rules out infanticide: A final reply to Räsänen. Bioethics. 33 (8), pp. 965-967.
AuthorsBlackshaw, B and Rodger, D
Abstract

Joona Räsänen has argued that pro-life arguments against the permissibility of infanticide are not persuasive, and fail to show it to be immoral. We responded to Räsänen’s arguments, concluding that his critique of pro-life arguments was misplaced. Räsänen has recently replied in ‘Why pro-life arguments still are not convincing: a reply to my critics’, providing some additional arguments as to why he does not find pro-life arguments against infanticide convincing. Here, we respond briefly to Räsänen’s critique of the substance view, and also to his most important claim: that possession of a right to life by an infant does not rule out the permissibility of infanticide. We demonstrate that this claim has little support, and conclude that Räsänen has not refuted pro-life arguments against infanticide.

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Rodgers, D and Blackshaw, B (2019) Why a right to life rules out infanticide: A final reply to Räsänen, Bioethics. Which will be published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14678519. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

KeywordsInfanticide; Rights; Animalism
Year2019
JournalBioethics
Journal citation33 (8), pp. 965-967
PublisherWiley
ISSN0269-9702
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/bioe.12646
Web address (URL)https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bioe.12646
Publication dates
Online06 Aug 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited06 Jun 2019
Accepted01 Jun 2019
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC 4.0
File Access Level
Open
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