Surgical fires: still a burning issue in England and Wales

Journal article


Rodger, D (2019). Surgical fires: still a burning issue in England and Wales. Journal of Perioperative Practice. https://doi.org/10.1177/1750458919861906
AuthorsRodger, D
Abstract

A significant number of surgical fires occur each year and can have devastating effects on patients. The National Reporting and Learning System database identified 37 reports of surgical fires in England and Wales between January 2012 and December 2018—over 52% resulting in some degree of harm. Surgical fires remain preventable adverse events that can be avoided by adherence to effective preventative strategies and improved education. This article surveys the existing literature, addressing the fire triad and how to effectively manage and prevent a surgical fire.

KeywordsSurgical fire; Patient safety; Communication; Human factors; Burns; Adverse events
Year2019
JournalJournal of Perioperative Practice
PublisherSAGE Publications
ISSN2515-7949
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/1750458919861906
Web address (URL)https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1750458919861906
Publication dates
Print16 Sep 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited04 Jun 2019
Accepted02 Jun 2019
Accepted author manuscript
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File Access Level
Open
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