The damping and structural properties of dragonfly and damselfly wings during dynamic movement

Journal article


Lietz, C., Schaber, C.F., Gorb, S.N. and Hamed, R. (2021). The damping and structural properties of dragonfly and damselfly wings during dynamic movement. Communications biology. 4, p. 737. https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-02263-2
AuthorsLietz, C., Schaber, C.F., Gorb, S.N. and Hamed, R.
Abstract

For flying insects, stability is essential to maintain the orientation and direction of motion in flight. Flight instability is caused by a variety of factors, such as intended abrupt flight manoeuvres and unwanted environmental disturbances. Although wings play a key role in insect flight stability, little is known about their oscillatory behaviour. Here we present the first systematic study of insect wing damping. We show that different wing regions have almost identical damping properties. The mean damping ratio of fresh wings is noticeably higher than that previously thought. Flight muscles and hemolymph have almost no ‘direct’ influence on the wing damping. In contrast, the involvement of the wing hinge can significantly increase damping. We also show that although desiccation reduces the wing damping ratio, rehydration leads to full recovery of damping properties after desiccation. Hence, we expect hemolymph to influence the wing damping indirectly, by continuously hydrating the wing system.

KeywordsInsect wings; dynamics; flight; Biomechanics
Year2021
JournalCommunications biology
Journal citation4, p. 737
PublisherSpringer
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-021-02263-2
Web address (URL)https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-021-02263-2
Publication dates
Print15 Jun 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted23 Apr 2021
Deposited21 Sep 2021
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Open
Accepted author manuscript
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