Critical Care Nurses' Views and Experiences of Preanalytical Factors Influencing Point-of-Care Testing A Qualitative Study

Journal article


Bench, S. (2020). Critical Care Nurses' Views and Experiences of Preanalytical Factors Influencing Point-of-Care Testing A Qualitative Study. Point of Care: The Journal of Near-Patient Testing and Technology.
AuthorsBench, S.
Abstract

The main users of point of care testing devices placed outside the central laboratory are clinicians, predominantly nurses. Understanding the factors influencing sample
accuracy is important to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. Previous studies focus on the analysis process, however, errors can also occur during the pre-analytical
phase, linked to user knowledge, skills and other factors associated with the wider context of care.

This study explored adult critical care nurses’ views about point of care testing, the challenges they experience and their suggestions on how the pre-analytic phase might
be improved. Using a qualitative design, four focus group discussions took place with 60 critical care nurses studying at two London based Universities between April and
July 2019. Anonymized and verbatim-transcribed focus group data were uploaded into NVivo11 and underwent a standard process of inductive thematic analysis. Findings suggest that nurses’ concerns focus on three key areas: Training and
competence; Sample frequency and volume; and impacts on patients, relatives and staff.

Critical care nurses view POCT as a necessary task, which aids timely patient management. However, the process can detract nurses from performing other care duties. Being able to draw less blood was identified as an important way to increase patient comfort and to reduce risks. Collaborative working is key to ensure that improvements made to the pre-analytical process reflect users’ needs. Ensuring best use of nurses’ time by streamlining preanalytical processes and ensuring equipment is readily available for use is important to ensure other clinical priorities can be achieved.

Keywordspoint of care; nursing; qualitative; focus groups
Year2020
JournalPoint of Care: The Journal of Near-Patient Testing and Technology
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN1533-029X
Publication process dates
Accepted12 Aug 2020
Deposited26 Oct 2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Additional information

This the accepted version of the manuscript.

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