Extant ape dental topography and its implications for reconstructing the emergence of early Homo

Journal article


Berthaume, M. and Schroer, K. (2017). Extant ape dental topography and its implications for reconstructing the emergence of early Homo. Journal of Human Evolution. 112, pp. 15-29.
AuthorsBerthaume, M. and Schroer, K.
Abstract

Dental topography has successfully predicted the diets of species in several extant and extinct 11 mammalian clades. However, dental topographic dietary reconstructions have high success rates only 12 when closely related taxa are compared. Given the dietary breadth that exists among extant apes and
13 likely existed among fossil hominins, dental topographic values from many species and subspecies of 14 great apes are necessary for making dietary inferences about the hominin fossil record. Here, we 15 present the results of one metric of dental topography, Dirichlet normal energy (DNE), for seven groups 16 of great apes (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes troglodytes and 17 schweinfurthii, Gorilla gorilla gorilla, Gorilla beringei graueri and beringei). DNE was inadequate at 18 differentiating folivores from frugivores, but was adequate at predicting which groups had more fibrous 19 diets among sympatric African apes. Character displacement analyses confirmed there is substantial 20 dental topographic and relative molar size (M1:M2 ratio; length, width, and area) divergence in sympatric 21 apes when compared to their allopatric counterparts, but character displacement is only present in
22 relative molar size when DNE is also considered. Presence of character displacement is likely due to 23 indirect competition over similar food resources. Assuming similar ecological conditions in the Plio-24 Pleistocene, the derived masticatory apparatuses of the robust australopithecines and early Homo may 25 be due to indirect competition over dietary resources between the taxa, causing dietary niche 26 partitioning. Our results imply that dental topography cannot be used to predict dietary categories in 27 fossil hominins without consideration of ecological factors such as dietary and geographic overlap. In 28 addition, our results may open new avenues for understanding the community compositions of early 29 hominins and the formation of specific ecological niches among hominin taxa.

Year2017
JournalJournal of Human Evolution
Journal citation112, pp. 15-29
PublisherElsevier
ISSN1095-8606
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2017.09.001
Web address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047248417303809
Publication dates
Print01 Nov 2017
Online29 Sep 2017
Publication process dates
Accepted05 Sep 2017
Deposited29 Nov 2019
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC-ND
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/889w3

  • 4
    total views
  • 2
    total downloads
  • 3
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Fabella prevalence rate increases over 150 years, and rates of other sesamoid bones remain constant: a systematic review
Berthaume, M., Di Federico, E. and Bill, A. (2019). Fabella prevalence rate increases over 150 years, and rates of other sesamoid bones remain constant: a systematic review. Journal of Anatomy. 235, pp. 67-79.
Effects of cropping, smoothing, triangle count, and mesh resolution on 6 dental topographic metrics
Berthaume, M., Winchester, J. and Kupczik, K (2019). Effects of cropping, smoothing, triangle count, and mesh resolution on 6 dental topographic metrics. PLoS ONE. 14 (5), p. e0216229.
Ambient occlusion and PCV (portion de ciel visible): A new dental topographic metric and proxy of morphological wear resistance
Berthaume, M., Winchester, J. and Kupczik, K. (2019). Ambient occlusion and PCV (portion de ciel visible): A new dental topographic metric and proxy of morphological wear resistance. PLoS ONE. 14 (5), p. e0215436.
Human biological variation in sesamoid bone prevalence: the curious case of the fabella
Berthaume, M. and Bull, A.M.J. (2019). Human biological variation in sesamoid bone prevalence: the curious case of the fabella. Journal of Anatomy.
Dental topography and the diet of Homo naledi
Berthaume, M., Delezene, L. and Kupczik, K. (2018). Dental topography and the diet of Homo naledi. Journal of Human Evolution. 118, pp. 14-26.
Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds
Gussekloo, S., Berthaume, M., Pulaski, D., Westbroek, I., Waarsing, J., Heinen, R., Grosse, I. and Dumont, E. (2017). Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds. Evolution. 71 (5), pp. 1327-1338.
Skeletal Immaturity, Rostral Sparing, and Disparate Hip Morphologies as Biomechanical Causes for Legg-Calve-Perthes’ Disease
Berthaume, M., Perry, D.C., Dobson, C., Witzel, U., Clarke, N.M. and Fagan, M. (2016). Skeletal Immaturity, Rostral Sparing, and Disparate Hip Morphologies as Biomechanical Causes for Legg-Calve-Perthes’ Disease . Clinical Anatomy.
On the relationship between tooth shape and masticatory efficiency: a finite element study
Berthaume, M. (2016). On the relationship between tooth shape and masticatory efficiency: a finite element study. The Anatomical Record. 299 (5), pp. 679-687.
Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology
Berthaume, M. (2016). Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology. Americal Journal of Physical Anthropology. 159, pp. 79-104.
What did Hadropithecus eat, and why should paleoanthropologists care?
Godfrey, L., Crowley, B., Muldoon, K., Kelley, E., King, S., Best, A. and Berthaume, M. (2016). What did Hadropithecus eat, and why should paleoanthropologists care? American Journal of Primatology. 78 (10), pp. 1098-1112.
Mechanical evidence that Australopithecus sediba was limited in its ability to eat hard foods
Ledogar, J., Smith, A., Benazzi, S., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Carlson, K., McNulty, K., Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q., Byron, C., Carlson, K., de Ruiter, D., Berger, L., Tamvada, K., Pryor, L., Berthaume, M. and Strait, D. (2016). Mechanical evidence that Australopithecus sediba was limited in its ability to eat hard foods. Nature Communications. 7 (1).
The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei
Smith, A., Benazzi, S, Ledogar, J., Tamvada, K., Pryor Smith, L., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Lucas, P., Michael, S., Shekeban, A., Al-Fadhalah, K., Almusallam, A, Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Madden, R., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q, Byron, C., Slice, D., Wood, S., Dzialo, C., Berthaume, M., van Casteren, A. and Strait, D. (2015). The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei. The Anatomical Record. 298 (1), pp. 145-167.
The effects of relative food item size on optimal tooth cusp sharpness during brittle food item processing
Berthaume, M., Dumont, E., Godfrey, L. and Grosse, I. (2014). The effects of relative food item size on optimal tooth cusp sharpness during brittle food item processing. Interface. 11 (101), p. 20140965.