The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei

Journal article


Smith, A., Benazzi, S, Ledogar, J., Tamvada, K., Pryor Smith, L., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Lucas, P., Michael, S., Shekeban, A., Al-Fadhalah, K., Almusallam, A, Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Madden, R., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q, Byron, C., Slice, D., Wood, S., Dzialo, C., Berthaume, M., van Casteren, A. and Strait, D. (2015). The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei. The Anatomical Record. 298 (1), pp. 145-167.
AuthorsSmith, A., Benazzi, S, Ledogar, J., Tamvada, K., Pryor Smith, L., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Lucas, P., Michael, S., Shekeban, A., Al-Fadhalah, K., Almusallam, A, Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Madden, R., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q, Byron, C., Slice, D., Wood, S., Dzialo, C., Berthaume, M., van Casteren, A. and Strait, D.
Abstract

The African Plio‐Pleistocene hominins known as australopiths evolved derived craniodental features frequently interpreted as adaptations for feeding on either hard, or compliant/tough foods. Among australopiths, Paranthropus boisei is the most robust form, exhibiting traits traditionally hypothesized to produce high bite forces efficiently and strengthen the face against feeding stresses. However, recent mechanical analyses imply that P. boisei may not have been an efficient producer of bite force and that robust morphology in primates is not necessarily strong. Here we use an engineering method, finite element analysis, to show that the facial skeleton of P. boisei is structurally strong, exhibits a strain pattern different from that in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and Australopithecus africanus, and efficiently produces high bite force. It has been suggested that P. boisei consumed a diet of compliant/tough foods like grass blades and sedge pith. However, the blunt occlusal topography of this and other species suggests that australopiths are adapted to consume hard foods, perhaps including grass and sedge seeds. A consideration of evolutionary trends in morphology relating to feeding mechanics suggests that food processing behaviors in gracile australopiths evidently were disrupted by environmental change, perhaps contributing to the eventual evolution of Homo and Paranthropus

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Smith, A. L., Benazzi, S. , Ledogar, J. A., Tamvada, K. , Pryor Smith, L. C., Weber, G. W., Spencer, M. A., Lucas, P. W., Michael, S. , Shekeban, A. , Al‐Fadhalah, K. , Almusallam, A. S., Dechow, P. C., Grosse, I. R., Ross, C. F., Madden, R. H., Richmond, B. G., Wright, B. W., Wang, Q. , Byron, C. , Slice, D. E., Wood, S. , Dzialo, C. , Berthaume, M. A., van, Casteren, A. and Strait, D. S. (2015), The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.23073. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions

Keywordsgeometric morphometrics; functional morphology; feeding biomechanics
Year2015
JournalThe Anatomical Record
Journal citation298 (1), pp. 145-167
PublisherWiley
ISSN0003-276X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1002/ar.23073
FunderNational Science Foundation "Biomesh"
EU FP6 Marie Curie Actions
Kuwait University General Facilities Project
Publication dates
Print21 Dec 2014
Publication process dates
Accepted11 Oct 2014
Deposited14 Nov 2019
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC
File Access Level
Open
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/88799

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