Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds

Journal article


Gussekloo, S., Berthaume, M., Pulaski, D., Westbroek, I., Waarsing, J., Heinen, R., Grosse, I. and Dumont, E. (2017). Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds. Evolution. 71 (5), pp. 1327-1338.
AuthorsGussekloo, S., Berthaume, M., Pulaski, D., Westbroek, I., Waarsing, J., Heinen, R., Grosse, I. and Dumont, E.
Abstract

Ostrich-like birds (Palaeognathae) show very little taxonomic diversity while their sister taxon (Neognathae) contains roughly 10,000 species. The main anatomical differences between the two taxa are in the crania. Palaeognaths lack an element in the bill called the lateral bar that is present in both ancestral theropods and modern neognaths, and have thin zones in the bones of the bill, and robust bony elements on the ventral surface of their crania. Here we use a combination of modeling and developmental experiments to investigate the processes that might have led to these differences. Engineering-based finite element analyses
indicate that removing the lateral bars from a neognath increases mechanical stress in the upper bill and the ventral elements of the skull, regions that are either more robust or more flexible in palaeognaths. Surgically removing the lateral bar from neognath hatchlings led to similar changes. These results indicate that the lateral bar is load-bearing and suggest that this function was transferred to other bony elements when it was lost in palaeognaths. It is possible that the loss of the load-bearing lateral bar might have constrained diversification of skull morphology in palaeognaths and thus limited taxonomic diversity within the group.

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Gussekloo, S. W., Berthaume, M. A., Pulaski, D. R., Westbroek, I. , Waarsing, J. H., Heinen, R. , Grosse, I. R. and Dumont, E. R. (2017), Functional and evolutionary consequences of cranial fenestration in birds. Evolution, 71: 1327-1338., which has been published in final form at 10.1111/evo.13210. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

KeywordsAdaptive radiation; avian evolution; cranial morphology; fenestration; finite element modeling
Year2017
JournalEvolution
Journal citation71 (5), pp. 1327-1338
PublisherWiley
ISSN0014-3820
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/evo.13210
FunderNational Science Foundation
Publication dates
Print23 Feb 2017
Publication process dates
Accepted27 Jan 2017
Deposited14 Nov 2019
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC 4.0
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/88786

  • 3
    total views
  • 2
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Fabella prevalence rate increases over 150 years, and rates of other sesamoid bones remain constant: a systematic review
Berthaume, M., Di Federico, E. and Bill, A. (2019). Fabella prevalence rate increases over 150 years, and rates of other sesamoid bones remain constant: a systematic review. Journal of Anatomy. 235, pp. 67-79.
Effects of cropping, smoothing, triangle count, and mesh resolution on 6 dental topographic metrics
Berthaume, M., Winchester, J. and Kupczik, K (2019). Effects of cropping, smoothing, triangle count, and mesh resolution on 6 dental topographic metrics. PLoS ONE. 14 (5), p. e0216229.
Ambient occlusion and PCV (portion de ciel visible): A new dental topographic metric and proxy of morphological wear resistance
Berthaume, M., Winchester, J. and Kupczik, K. (2019). Ambient occlusion and PCV (portion de ciel visible): A new dental topographic metric and proxy of morphological wear resistance. PLoS ONE. 14 (5), p. e0215436.
Human biological variation in sesamoid bone prevalence: the curious case of the fabella
Berthaume, M. and Bull, A.M.J. (2019). Human biological variation in sesamoid bone prevalence: the curious case of the fabella. Journal of Anatomy.
Dental topography and the diet of Homo naledi
Berthaume, M., Delezene, L. and Kupczik, K. (2018). Dental topography and the diet of Homo naledi. Journal of Human Evolution. 118, pp. 14-26.
Extant ape dental topography and its implications for reconstructing the emergence of early Homo
Berthaume, M. and Schroer, K. (2017). Extant ape dental topography and its implications for reconstructing the emergence of early Homo. Journal of Human Evolution. 112, pp. 15-29.
Skeletal Immaturity, Rostral Sparing, and Disparate Hip Morphologies as Biomechanical Causes for Legg-Calve-Perthes’ Disease
Berthaume, M., Perry, D.C., Dobson, C., Witzel, U., Clarke, N.M. and Fagan, M. (2016). Skeletal Immaturity, Rostral Sparing, and Disparate Hip Morphologies as Biomechanical Causes for Legg-Calve-Perthes’ Disease . Clinical Anatomy.
On the relationship between tooth shape and masticatory efficiency: a finite element study
Berthaume, M. (2016). On the relationship between tooth shape and masticatory efficiency: a finite element study. The Anatomical Record. 299 (5), pp. 679-687.
Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology
Berthaume, M. (2016). Food mechanical properties and dietary ecology. Americal Journal of Physical Anthropology. 159, pp. 79-104.
What did Hadropithecus eat, and why should paleoanthropologists care?
Godfrey, L., Crowley, B., Muldoon, K., Kelley, E., King, S., Best, A. and Berthaume, M. (2016). What did Hadropithecus eat, and why should paleoanthropologists care? American Journal of Primatology. 78 (10), pp. 1098-1112.
Mechanical evidence that Australopithecus sediba was limited in its ability to eat hard foods
Ledogar, J., Smith, A., Benazzi, S., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Carlson, K., McNulty, K., Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q., Byron, C., Carlson, K., de Ruiter, D., Berger, L., Tamvada, K., Pryor, L., Berthaume, M. and Strait, D. (2016). Mechanical evidence that Australopithecus sediba was limited in its ability to eat hard foods. Nature Communications. 7 (1).
The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei
Smith, A., Benazzi, S, Ledogar, J., Tamvada, K., Pryor Smith, L., Weber, G., Spencer, M., Lucas, P., Michael, S., Shekeban, A., Al-Fadhalah, K., Almusallam, A, Dechow, P., Grosse, I., Ross, C., Madden, R., Richmond, B., Wright, B., Wang, Q, Byron, C., Slice, D., Wood, S., Dzialo, C., Berthaume, M., van Casteren, A. and Strait, D. (2015). The Feeding Biomechanics and Dietary Ecology of Paranthropus boisei. The Anatomical Record. 298 (1), pp. 145-167.
The effects of relative food item size on optimal tooth cusp sharpness during brittle food item processing
Berthaume, M., Dumont, E., Godfrey, L. and Grosse, I. (2014). The effects of relative food item size on optimal tooth cusp sharpness during brittle food item processing. Interface. 11 (101), p. 20140965.