A longitudinal, mixed methods investigation of newly qualified nurses’ workplace stressors and stress experiences during transition

Journal article


Halpin, Y, Terry, LM and Curzio, J (2017). A longitudinal, mixed methods investigation of newly qualified nurses’ workplace stressors and stress experiences during transition. Journal of Advanced Nursing.
AuthorsHalpin, Y, Terry, LM and Curzio, J
Abstract

Aim To investigate transition in newly qualified nurses through an exploration of their stressors and stress experiences during their first 12 months post-qualifying. Background Globally, thousands of new nurses qualify annually. They are crucial for the profession and healthcare service delivery. Work-related stress has multiple serious consequences, yet there is a lack of robust, empirical evidence that directly analyses newly qualified nurses and the stress they feel and experience in the workplace. Understanding what causes newly qualified nurses’ stress is vital to retaining and nurturing this vital component of the workforce. Design Longitudinal, explanatory sequential mixed methods, cohort study. Methods At the point of qualification (n= 288), 6 months post-qualifying (n= 107) and 12 months post-qualifying (n= 86), newly qualified nurses completed the Nursing Stress Scale, with n= 14 completing a one-to-one interview at 12 months post-qualifying. Data were collected from 2010-2012. Inferential statistics, ‘thematic analysis’ and ‘side-by-side comparisons in a discussion’ were used for analysis. Results/Findings Workload was consistently the highest reported stressor with inadequate staffing and managing multiple role demands given as explanations. Incivility within the workplace was a noted stressor. Conversely, being part of ‘a good team’ provided a civil, supportive, facilitative work environment. Entering nurse education with previous healthcare experience had a mediating effect on the reported frequency of stressors. Conclusions Newly qualified nurses encounter multiple work-related stressors over their first 12 months post-qualifying, which are intrinsically entwined with their transition. Employing organisations need to be more proactive in managing their workload and addressing workplace incivility.

KeywordsNewly qualified nurse; transition; stress; workload; incivility; mixed methods; longitudinal; 1110 Nursing; Nursing
Year2017
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Inc.
ISSN0309-2402
Publication dates
Print24 May 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited09 May 2017
Accepted11 Apr 2017
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86z45

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