First responders and autism

Book chapter


Chown, N., Beardon, L. and Cossburn, K. (2018). First responders and autism. in: Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders New York
AuthorsChown, N., Beardon, L. and Cossburn, K.
Abstract

Although only about 1% of the population are autistic (Brugha et al., 2012) there is someevidence to suggest that people with disabilities, including autism, come into contact with thecriminal justice system significantly more often than predominant neurotype1 (PNT) (non-autistic) individuals. Although autistic people are statistically less disposed to criminality(Mouridsen et al., 2007), they are seven times more likely to be arrested (Curry, Posluszny,and Kraska, 1993), sometimes unlawfully. The longer they remain in the criminal justicesystem, the greater the injustice and suffering inflicted upon them. There are also potentialnegative impacts on the police such as a greater risk of litigation, waste of resources, andnegative public relations. There is a clear need for the police, and, in particular, officersinitially on the scene of an incident (first responders), to have a sufficient understanding ofautism, how it may present in an individual, and how best to handle incidents involving anautistic person.

Year2018
Book titleEncyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders
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File Access Level
Open
Place of publicationNew York
ISBN978-1-4419-1699-0
Publication dates
Print25 Mar 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited26 Oct 2021
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3
Web address (URL)https://link.springer.com/referencework/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8y14z

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