Pathological demand avoidance: my thoughts on looping effects and commodification of autism

Journal article


Woods, R. (2017). Pathological demand avoidance: my thoughts on looping effects and commodification of autism. Disability & Society. 32 (5), pp. 753-758. https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2017.1308705
AuthorsWoods, R.
Abstract

Hacking suggests autism is a human kind, and has used autism to discuss their evolution over time. Looping effects caused the autism human kind to evolve since 1995, with people identifying with the autism human kind, and the commodification of the autism human kind by the autism industry. Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) was created from the looping effects controlled by the autism industry. This has undermined autism self-advocacy by supporting the medical paradigm of the autism human kind. By refusing to engage with PDA, people of the autism human kind limit the commodification of autism; creating greater emancipation.

KeywordsAutism, pathological demand avoidance, looping effects, human kinds, commodification, self-advocacy
Year2017
JournalDisability & Society
Journal citation32 (5), pp. 753-758
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2017.1308705
Web address (URL)https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687599.2017.1308705
Publication dates
Print31 Mar 2017
Publication process dates
Accepted10 Mar 2017
Deposited13 Oct 2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Additional information

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Disability and Society on 31/02/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09687599.2017.1308705

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Accepted author manuscript
10 March D&S Submission pre-print.docx
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

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