Innovative environmentally sustainable concrete: Explaining the low uptake in UK construction activities

Conference paper


Ebohon, O., Kangwa, J. and Perinpanathan, S. (2019). Innovative environmentally sustainable concrete: Explaining the low uptake in UK construction activities. The 13th Built Environment Conference. Durban, South Africa 02 - 03 Sep 2019 Association of Schools of Construction of Southern Africa.
AuthorsEbohon, O., Kangwa, J. and Perinpanathan, S.
TypeConference paper
Abstract

Purpose of this paper
This study explores the reasons for the low uptake of innovated environmentally sustainable concrete by the UK construction industry. Despite the significant impact the manufacturing and use of concrete has on the natural environment on the one hand, and on the other, the commitment of the UK construction industry to the UK Government’s carbon emissions target, it is of great concerns that innovated environmentally concrete is disregarded by the industry. Concrete is the second most used building material in the world; it is comprised of cement, sand, aggregates and water; all of which are critical to the ecosystem and the environmental media. The cement within concrete accounts for 8% of total global CO2 emissions whose atmospheric concentration induces unpredictable changes in global
weather patterns euphemistically referred to as climate change, and with devastating consequences. Against this background, governments around the world have voluntarily established carbon reduction targets, and in the case of the United Kingdom, this target has been set at 80% to be achieved by 2050. To this end, various policy instruments have been introduced by the UK government to encourage households and businesses, which are deemed as critical partners in the delivery of set reduction target. This is why it is important to ascertain why innovated sustainable concrete is not widely used in UK construction despites the efforts of the government and the commitment of the
construction industry to sustainable operations.
Design/methodology/approach
Apart from the critical literature review undertaken to appreciate and understand previous research efforts relating to product innovation generally, and in particular, innovation within the construction industry, a qualitative research methodology was adopted, given the desire for greater understanding of product innovation trends and challenges in the construction sector, albeit with particular focus on the low uptake of sustainable concrete. A semi-structured interview was conducted on construction
professionals who have particular interests and expertise working in the UK concrete industry supply chain. The results were thematically coded using open-coding and analysed into factors that influence the uptake of new sustainable concrete.
Findings
The main factors established that explain the low uptake of innovated environmentally sustainable concrete in the UK construction industry include; cost, quality, practicality, testing and durability issues, risk avoidance, poor marketing and promotion, government policy, construction culture as well as lack of cohesion and collaboration in the concrete supply chain. Conclusions and recommendations were established based on these findings to encourage the uptake of innovated sustainable concrete in UK construction activities, and enable the UK government fulfill its reduction target for carbon emissions.
Research limitations/implications (if applicable)
The study is limited to concrete and the United Kingdom. The implication being other innovative environmentally sustainable building materials may also be encountering similar market penetration challenges as sustainable concretes. Similarly, this situation may not be unique to the United Kingdom in which case, meeting carbon emissions reduction targets set by many countries may prove more difficult than would have been previously envisaged without critical attention being paid to the sustainability attributes to construction input supply chains.
Practical implications
This study provides insights to acute challenges facing environmentally sustainable construction materials in the market place and allows targeted interventions that will ensure innovations in construction materials are not stifled in the UK.
What is original/value of paper.
Findings and conclusions drawn from this study will not concentrate minds on how to better support construction product innovations, a necessary move that will assist global efforts in meeting carbon emissions targets.

Year2019
PublisherAssociation of Schools of Construction of Southern Africa
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open
Publication dates
Print02 Sep 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited25 Nov 2019
Accepted25 Jul 2019
ISBN978-0-6399855-1-0
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/888v7

  • 3
    total views
  • 2
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Disaster 'soft' and 'hard' laws: building resilience for displaced people in the Middle East and North Africa (mena) region.
Eltinay, N, Egbu, C, Ofori, G and Ebohon, OJ (2017). Disaster 'soft' and 'hard' laws: building resilience for displaced people in the Middle East and North Africa (mena) region. COBRA 2017. UCL: London
Exploring the perceptions of construction SMEs on appropriate supporting policies for growth and development by the Qatari government for effective participation in infrastructure procurement and delivery for the 2022 World Cup
Kangwa, J and Ebohon, O J (2019). Exploring the perceptions of construction SMEs on appropriate supporting policies for growth and development by the Qatari government for effective participation in infrastructure procurement and delivery for the 2022 World Cup. ASOCSA 12th Built Environment Conference. Durban, South Africa 05 - 07 Aug 2018 Association of Schools of Construction of Southern Africa.
Where are the Barriers to Sustainable Construction in Africa? Key Note Speech
Kangwa, J (2019). Where are the Barriers to Sustainable Construction in Africa? Key Note Speech. ASOCSA 12th Built Environment Conference. Durban, South Africa 05 - 07 Aug 2018
Examining the Relationships between Young Adults’ Housing Tenure, Elements of Perceived Job Security and Social Capital in Britain
Aguda, O., Ebohon, O. and Leishman, C. (2019). Examining the Relationships between Young Adults’ Housing Tenure, Elements of Perceived Job Security and Social Capital in Britain. European Real Estate Society (ERES). Cergy-Pontoise Cedex, France 03 - 06 Jul 2019
Perceptibility of barriers and threats to successful and sustainable restoration of Heritage Buildings. A perspective of UK’s heritage practitioners
Kangwa, J., Ebohon, O., Haupt, T. and Olubodun, F. (2019). Perceptibility of barriers and threats to successful and sustainable restoration of Heritage Buildings. A perspective of UK’s heritage practitioners. The 13th Built Environment Conference. Durban, South Africa 02 - 03 Sep 2019 Association of Schools of Construction of Southern Africa. doi:978-0-6399855-1-0
A Geospatial Approach to Sustainable Urban Planning: Lessons for Morogoro Municipal Council, Tanzania
Sumari, N.S., Xu, G., Ujoh, F., Korah, P.I., Ebohon, O. and Lyimo, N.N. (2019). A Geospatial Approach to Sustainable Urban Planning: Lessons for Morogoro Municipal Council, Tanzania. Sustainability. 11 (22), p. 6508.
Exploiting automated technologies for reduction of rework in construction housing supply chain
Shahparvari, M., Robinson, H., Fong, D. and Ebohon, O. (2019). Exploiting automated technologies for reduction of rework in construction housing supply chain. Creative Construction Conference 2019. Budapest, Hungary 29 Jun - 02 Jul 2019 doi:10.3311/CCC2019-008
Suitability of Anthill Soil as a Supplementary Cementitious Material
Kangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A and Hirst, P (2018). Suitability of Anthill Soil as a Supplementary Cementitious Material. European Journal of Engineering Research and Science -EJERS. 3 (7), pp. 5-11.
Public Private Partnerships (PPP) in the Developing World: Mitigating Financiers' Risks
Owolabi, HA, Ebohon, O, Oyedele, L, Alaka, H and Ajayi, S (2018). Public Private Partnerships (PPP) in the Developing World: Mitigating Financiers' Risks. World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development.
Permeability of Corncob Ash, Anthill soils and Rice husk replaced concrete
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2017). Permeability of Corncob Ash, Anthill soils and Rice husk replaced concrete. International Journal of Science, Environment and Technology. 6 (2), pp. 1299-1308.
Viability of using Corncob Ash as a Pozzolan in Concrete
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2016). Viability of using Corncob Ash as a Pozzolan in Concrete. International Journal of Science, Environment and Technology. 5 (6), pp. 4532-4544.
Suitability of Corncob Ash as a supplementary Cementitious Material
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2016). Suitability of Corncob Ash as a supplementary Cementitious Material. International Journal of Materials Science and Engineering. 4 (4), pp. 215-228.
Performance of Class F Pulverised Fuel Ash and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag in Ternary Concrete Mixes
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2017). Performance of Class F Pulverised Fuel Ash and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag in Ternary Concrete Mixes. EJERS, European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (6), pp. 36-41.
Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete
Kangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Hyndman, F (2017). Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete. European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (3), pp. 36-43.