Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete

Journal article


Kangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Hyndman, F (2017). Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete. European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (3), pp. 36-43.
AuthorsKangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Hyndman, F
Abstract

Supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) have been known to improve the properties of fresh and hardened concrete, and at the same time enhance the sustainability of concrete. Rice husk Ash (RHA), is one such material, but has neither been widely studied nor applied in practice. This work investigated the effect of the density of RHA on the workability and compressive strength of fresh and hardened RHA-replaced concrete respectively. Cement was replaced with RHA in concrete by weight (RHA-W) and by volume (RHA-V) at steps of 0%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25% and 30%. The 0% replacement was used as the reference point from which performances were measured. Results showed that unlike the characteristic of other established pozzolans, RHA significantly reduced the workability of wet concrete and the rate of compressive strength gain over curing time due to a high water demand that is caused by the increased volume of replaced concrete, which results from its low density. Workability reduced with increased replacement for both RHA-W and RHA-V. Replacements of above 15% were not possible for the RHA-W due to the high water demand. However, replacements of up to 30% were achieved for the RHA-V. RHA-W specimens achieved lower compressive strengths and were observed to gain strength at a lower rate over the 28 to 91-days period of curing compared to RHA-V specimens. This behavior was attributed to the shortage of water that is necessary for the hydration of cement and subsequent pozzolanic reaction, which is the basis of the contribution that is made to the strength and performance of concrete by SCMs. However, the compressive strengths achieved were above the study’s target concrete strength of class C32/40 at 91 days, which is among those classes that are listed as being durable and suitable for structural applications. A conclusion that RHA should supplement cements by volumetric replacement rather than simple substitution by weight was drawn.

KeywordsCompressive Strength; Density; Rice Husk Ash; Volume; Workability
Year2017
JournalEuropean Journal of Engineering Research and Science
Journal citation2 (3), pp. 36-43
PublisherLondon South Bank University
ISSN2506-8016
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.24018/ejers.2017.2.3.292
Publication dates
Print30 Mar 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited30 May 2017
Accepted02 Mar 2017
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86zyw

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