“The Pandemic is Just Happening on Top of a Pandemic for Us”. Unpaid Carers’ Experiences of Lockdown in the UK: A Thematic Analysis

Journal article


Moultrie, E., Mallion, J. and Taylor-Page, C. (2024). “The Pandemic is Just Happening on Top of a Pandemic for Us”. Unpaid Carers’ Experiences of Lockdown in the UK: A Thematic Analysis. Journal of Long Term Care. https://doi.org/10.31389/jltc.156
AuthorsMoultrie, E., Mallion, J. and Taylor-Page, C.
Abstract

Context: With reduced access to medical and social support during the COVID-19 pandemic, the level of support provided by unpaid carers over the lockdown period in the UK was higher than ever. However, the experience of unpaid carers during this period is often overlooked.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the question ‘what has been the experience of unpaid carers during lockdown?’.

Method: Eighteen unpaid carers, caring for a family member(s) with physical, learning, mental health, or behavioral disabilities, were interviewed about their experience of lockdown in the UK. Thematic analysis was utilized.

Findings: Three overarching themes created: (a) The value of support, (b) Non-stop care, and (c) Risk to health. A central theme of mental health was also created and discussed across the three overarching themes, rather than individually, due to its extensivity. Support for unpaid carers during the lockdown became more important than ever due to the higher risk to physical and mental health (of both the carer and dependent) and the lack of respite available.

Limitations: Due to volunteer sampling, the evidence in this report is largely based on the perspectives of female carers’, with all but two participants being female.

Implications: Findings raise implications for prioritizing the return of in-person medical appointments post-pandemic and ensuring the continuation of support services for unpaid carers during a pandemic.

Year2024
JournalJournal of Long Term Care
PublisherLSE Press
ISSN2516-9122
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.31389/jltc.156
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.31389/jltc.156
Publication dates
Online10 Jan 2024
Publication process dates
Deposited08 Feb 2024
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
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