Good Lives Model: Importance of Interagency Collaboration in Preventing Violent Recidivism

Journal article


Mallion, J. (2021). Good Lives Model: Importance of Interagency Collaboration in Preventing Violent Recidivism. Societies. 11 (3), p. e96. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11030096
AuthorsMallion, J.
AbstractViolence is a complex and multifaceted problem requiring a holistic and individualized response. The Good Lives Model (GLM) suggests violence occurs when an individual experiences internal and external obstacles in the pursuit of universal human needs (termed primary goods). With a twin focus, GLM-consistent interventions aim to promote attainment of primary goods, whilst simultaneously reducing risk of reoffending. This is achieved by improving an individuals’ internal (i.e., skills and abilities) and external capacities (i.e., opportunities, environments, and resources). This paper proposes that collaborations between different agencies (e.g., psychological services, criminal justice systems, social services, education, community organizations, and healthcare) can support the attainment of primary goods through the provision of specialized skills and resources. Recommendations for ensuring interagency collaborations are effective are outlined, including embedding a project lead, regular interagency meetings and training, establishing information sharing procedures, and defining the role each agency plays in client care.
Keywordsgood lives model; violence; intervention; interagency collaboration
Year2021
JournalSocieties
Journal citation11 (3), p. e96
PublisherMDPI
ISSN2075-4698
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11030096
Publication dates
Online11 Aug 2021
Publication process dates
Accepted09 Aug 2021
Deposited17 Aug 2021
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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