Disentangling self- and fairness-related neural mechanisms involved in the ultimatum game: an fMRI study

Journal article


Corradi-Dell'Acqua, C., Civai, C., Rumiati, R.I. and Fink, G.R. (2013). Disentangling self- and fairness-related neural mechanisms involved in the ultimatum game: an fMRI study. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 8 (4), p. 424–431. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nss014
AuthorsCorradi-Dell'Acqua, C., Civai, C., Rumiati, R.I. and Fink, G.R.
Abstract

Rejections of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG) are commonly assumed to reflect negative emotional arousal mediated by the anterior insula and medial prefrontal cortex. We aimed to disentangle those neural mechanisms associated with direct personal involvement (I have been treated unfairly) from those associated with fairness considerations, such as the wish to discourage unfair behavior or social norm violations (this person has been treated unfairly). For this purpose, we used fMRI and asked participants to play the UG as responders either for themselves (myself) or on behalf of
another person (third party). Unfair offers were equally often rejected in both conditions. Neuroimaging data revealed a dissociation between the medial prefrontal cortex, specifically associated with rejections in the myself condition, thus confirming its role in self-related emotional responses, and the left anterior insula, associated with rejections in both myself and third-party conditions, suggesting a role in promoting fair behavior also toward third parties. Our data extend the current understanding of the neural substrate of social decision making, by disentangling the structures sensitive to direct
emotional involvement of the self from those implicated in pure fairness considerations

Year2013
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Journal citation8 (4), p. 424–431
PublisherOxford University Press (OUP)
ISSN1749-5024
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nss014
Web address (URL)http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=ORCID&SrcApp=OrcidOrg&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=WOS_CPL&KeyUT=WOS:000318315600010&KeyUID=WOS:000318315600010
Publication dates
Online01 Mar 2012
Publication process dates
Deposited20 Jan 2023
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/93117

Download files


Publisher's version
nss014.pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

  • 4
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 4
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

How perceived scarcity predicted cooperation during early pandemic lockdown.
Civai, C., Caserotti, M., Carrus, E., Huijsmans, I. and Rubaltelli, E. (2022). How perceived scarcity predicted cooperation during early pandemic lockdown. Frontiers in Psychology. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.951757
Does unfairness sound wrong? A cross-domain investigation of expectations in music and social decision-making
Civai, C, Teodorini, R and Carrus, E (2020). Does unfairness sound wrong? A cross-domain investigation of expectations in music and social decision-making. Royal Society Open Science. 7 (9). https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.190048
Mentalizing in value-based social decision-making: shaping expectations and social norms
Civai, C and Sanfey, A (2019). Mentalizing in value-based social decision-making: shaping expectations and social norms. in: Gilead, M and Ochsner, K (ed.) The Neural Basis of Mentalizing - A Social-Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Perspective Springer.
A scarcity mindset alters neural processing underlying consumer decision making
Huijsmans, I, Ma, I, Micheli, L, Civai, C, Stallen, M and G Sanfey, A (2019). A scarcity mindset alters neural processing underlying consumer decision making. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1818572116
Neurocognitive mechanisms of reactions to second- and third-party justice violations.
Civai, C, Huijsmans, I and Sanfey, A (2019). Neurocognitive mechanisms of reactions to second- and third-party justice violations. Scientific Reports. 9. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-45725-8
Effects of serotonin depletion and dopamine depletion on bimodal divided attention.
Königschulte, W, Civai, C, Hildebrand, P, Gaber, TJ, Fink, GR and Zepf, FD (2018). Effects of serotonin depletion and dopamine depletion on bimodal divided attention. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.1080/15622975.2018.1532110
Game Theory in Neuroeconomics
Civai, C and Hawes, DR (2016). Game Theory in Neuroeconomics. in: Reuter, M and Montag, C (ed.) Neuroeconomics Springer. pp. 13-40
The Enhancement of Social Norm Compliance: Prospects and Caveats
Civai, C and Ma, I (2017). The Enhancement of Social Norm Compliance: Prospects and Caveats. Journal of Cognitive Enhancement. 1 (1), pp. 26-30. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41465-017-0009-4
Intelligence and Extraversion in the neural evaluation of delayed rewards
Civai, C, Hawes, DR, DeYoung, CG and Rustichini, A (2016). Intelligence and Extraversion in the neural evaluation of delayed rewards. Journal of Research in Personality. 61, pp. 99-108. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2016.02.006
Predicting the other in cooperative interactions.
Sanfey, AG, Civai, C and Vavra, P (2015). Predicting the other in cooperative interactions. Trends in cognitive sciences. 19 (7), pp. 364-365. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2015.05.009
Medial prefrontal cortex reacts to unfairness if this damages the self: a tDCS study.
Civai, C, Miniussi, C and Rumiati, RI (2014). Medial prefrontal cortex reacts to unfairness if this damages the self: a tDCS study. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 10 (8), pp. 1054-1060. https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsu154
Rejecting unfairness: emotion-driven reaction or cognitive heuristic?
Civai, C (2013). Rejecting unfairness: emotion-driven reaction or cognitive heuristic? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 7, p. 126. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00126
Framing the ultimatum game: the contribution of simulation.
Tomasino, B, Lotto, L, Sarlo, M, Civai, C, Rumiati, R and Rumiati, RI (2013). Framing the ultimatum game: the contribution of simulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 7, p. 337. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00337