Neurocognitive mechanisms of reactions to second- and third-party justice violations.

Journal article


Civai, C, Huijsmans, I and Sanfey, A (2019). Neurocognitive mechanisms of reactions to second- and third-party justice violations. Scientific Reports. 9.
AuthorsCivai, C, Huijsmans, I and Sanfey, A
Abstract

The aim of the current study was threefold: (i) understand people's willingness to engage in either punishment of the perpetrator or compensation of the victim in order to counteract injustice; (ii) look into the differences between victims of and witnesses to injustice; (iii) investigate the different role played by social preference and affective experience in determining these choices. The sample tested here showed an equal preference for punishment and compensation; neuroimaging findings suggested that compensation, as opposed to punishment, was related to Theory of Mind. Partially supporting previous literature, choosing how to react to an injustice as victims, rather than witnesses, triggered a stronger affective response (striatal and prefrontal activation). Moreover, results supported the idea that deciding whether or not to react to an injustice and then how severely to react are two distinct decisional stages underpinned by different neurocognitive mechanisms, i.e., sensitivity to unfairness (anterior insula) and negative affectivity (amygdala). These findings provide a fine-grained description of the psychological mechanisms underlying important aspects of social norm compliance.

Year2019
JournalScientific Reports
Journal citation9
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature)
ISSN2045-2322
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1038/s41598-019-45725-8
Publication dates
Print25 Jun 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited27 Jun 2019
Accepted12 Jun 2019
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86619

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