Experiences of Using Pathways and Resources for Participation and Engagement (PREP) Intervention for Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Knowledge Translation Study

Journal article


Burrough, M., Beanlands, C. and Sugarhood, P. (2020). Experiences of Using Pathways and Resources for Participation and Engagement (PREP) Intervention for Children with Acquired Brain Injury: A Knowledge Translation Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 17 (23), pp. 8736-8736. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238736
AuthorsBurrough, M., Beanlands, C. and Sugarhood, P.
Abstract

<jats:p>Background: Children with acquired brain injury experience participation restrictions. Pathways and Resources for Participation and Engagement (PREP) is an innovative, participation focused intervention. Studies have examined PREP in Canadian research contexts, however little is known about implementation in real-life clinical settings. This study aimed to understand experiences of clinicians implementing PREP in a UK clinical context, with a focus on implementation processes and key factors for successful implementation. Methods: A qualitative single-site 8-week knowledge translation intervention study, guided by an action research framework, explored clinicians’ experiences of implementation. Six occupational therapists (OTs) working in a neurorehabilitation setting participated. The therapists provided two intervention sessions per week, over four weeks for one child on their caseload. Planning, implementation and evaluation were explored through two focus groups. Thematic analysis was used to analyse data. Results: Two themes, “key ingredients before you start” and “PREP guides the journey”, were identified before introducing PREP to practice. Four additional themes were related to PREP implementation: “shifting to a participation perspective”, “participation moves beyond the OT”, “environmental challengers and remedies” and “whole family readiness”. A participation ripple effect was observed by building capacity across the multi-disciplinary team and families. The involvement of peers, social opportunities and acknowledging family readiness were key factors for successful implementation. Conclusions: The findings illustrate practical guidance to facilitate the uptake of participation-based evidence in clinical practice. Further research is required to understand aspects of knowledge translation when implementing participation interventions in other UK clinical settings.</jats:p>

Year2020
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Journal citation17 (23), pp. 8736-8736
PublisherMDPI AG
ISSN1660-4601
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238736
Publication dates
Online24 Nov 2020
Publication process dates
Accepted20 Nov 2020
Deposited27 Nov 2020
Accepted author manuscript
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Open
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ijerph-17-08736-v2.pdf
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