Participation in advanced age: enacting values, an adaptive process

Journal article


Sugarhood, PA, Eakin, P and Summerfield-Mann, L (2016). Participation in advanced age: enacting values, an adaptive process. Ageing and Society.
AuthorsSugarhood, PA, Eakin, P and Summerfield-Mann, L
Abstract

The concept of participation, introduced through models such as the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, has become increasingly important in health and social care. However, it has not been consistently defined or operationalised and there is very limited research into participation in the context of advanced age and disability. This article reports a study which explored participation from the perspectives of community-living people aged over 80 years with physical rehabilitation needs. Using a grounded theory methodology, 11 participants aged 81-96 years were recruited from a National Health Service Trust in the United Kingdom. The main finding was that participation was experienced as the enacting of values. Values provided the motivation for specific ways of participating in life, guided actions and behaviours, and were the means through which participation was interpreted. Commonly enacted values were: connecting with others; maintaining autonomy; affirming abilities; doing the best you can; being useful; maintaining self-identity; and pursuing interests. A process was evident whereby participation was challenged by deteriorating health and losses and the participants adapted (or not) to overcome these challenges. To promote participation in advanced age, health and social care policy and practice must consider the values important to older people. Interventions should be congruent with these values and promote strategies through which they can be enacted.

KeywordsParticipation; International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); Advanced age; Disability; Values
Year2016
JournalAgeing and Society
PublisherCambridge University Press (CUP): HSS Journals
ISSN1469-1779
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1017/S0144686X16000568
Publication dates
Print20 Jun 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited22 Aug 2016
Accepted22 Apr 2016
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/873qq

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