Performance of Anthill Soil Replaced Concrete in Sulfate Solutions

Journal article


Kamau, J, Ahmed, A and Hirst, P (2017). Performance of Anthill Soil Replaced Concrete in Sulfate Solutions. EJERS, European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (5), pp. 50-55. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejers.2017.2.5.351
AuthorsKamau, J, Ahmed, A and Hirst, P
Abstract

Durability of concrete is defined as its ability to resist any form of deterioration, allowing it to retain its original form and quality after it has been exposed to the environment of its intended use. Sulfate attack causes concrete to lose its compressive strength through the decomposition of the products of hydration of cement. Pozzolanic reactions from Supplementary Cementitious Materials (SCMs) help in resisting the sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) attack. This work investigated the potential use of Anthill Soil (AHS) to improve the performance of concrete in sulfate aggressive environments. An AHS replacement of 30% (per cent) by the weight of cement was used to make concrete test bars and cubes. The 0% replacement also referred to as the control was used as the point of reference from which all performances were measured. The specimens were immersed in 5% Na2SO4, 5% magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), and 5% mixed solution of Na2SO4 and MgSO4. Elongation measurements were taken over a period of 9 months, whereas compressive strength tests, which were used to work out the Strength Deterioration Factors (SDFs) and visual observations for surface deterioration were carried out at 9 months. From the results, AHS specimens that were immersed in the Na2SO4, MgSO4 and mixed Na2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions performed poorly in elongation compared with the control specimens, but had lower SDFs in the Na2SO4 and mixed solutions of Na2SO4 and MgSO4. The surface deterioration of AHS specimens in the MgSO4 solution was worse than that of the control specimens but was similar to that of the control in the mixed sulfate solution of Na2SO4 and MgSO4. The SDF results highlight the potential of using AHS with an advantage in Na2SO4 and mixed Na2SO4 and MgSO4 environments.

KeywordsAnthill Soil; Sulfate Attack; Sulfate Resistance; Sulfate Aggressive Environments
Year2017
JournalEJERS, European Journal of Engineering Research and Science
Journal citation2 (5), pp. 50-55
Publisher European Open Access Publishing (EUROPA)
ISSN2506-8016
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.24018/ejers.2017.2.5.351
Publication dates
Print21 May 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited30 May 2017
Accepted05 May 2017
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86z4q

Download files

Publisher's version
351-1484-1-PB performance of anthill soil replacement.pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

  • 20
    total views
  • 61
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

In-vivo Barretts esophagus digital pathology stage classification through feature enhancement of confocal laser endomicroscopy
Ghatwary, N, Ahmed, A, Grisan, E, Jalab, H, Bidaut, L and Ye, X (2019). In-vivo Barretts esophagus digital pathology stage classification through feature enhancement of confocal laser endomicroscopy. J Med Imaging (Bellingham). 6 (1). https://doi.org/https://www.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMI.6.1.014502
Suitability of Anthill Soil as a Supplementary Cementitious Material
Kangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A and Hirst, P (2018). Suitability of Anthill Soil as a Supplementary Cementitious Material. European Journal of Engineering Research and Science -EJERS. 3 (7), pp. 5-11. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejers.2018.3.7.785
Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete
Kangwa, J, Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Hyndman, F (2017). Influence of Rice Husk Ash Density on the workability and strength of structural concrete. European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (3), pp. 36-43. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejers.2017.2.3.292
Permeability of Corncob Ash, Anthill soils and Rice husk replaced concrete
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2017). Permeability of Corncob Ash, Anthill soils and Rice husk replaced concrete. International Journal of Science, Environment and Technology. 6 (2), pp. 1299-1308.
Performance of Class F Pulverised Fuel Ash and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag in Ternary Concrete Mixes
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2017). Performance of Class F Pulverised Fuel Ash and Ground Granulated Blast Furnace Slag in Ternary Concrete Mixes. EJERS, European Journal of Engineering Research and Science. 2 (6), pp. 36-41. https://doi.org/10.24018/ejers.2017.2.6.363
Viability of using Corncob Ash as a Pozzolan in Concrete
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2016). Viability of using Corncob Ash as a Pozzolan in Concrete. International Journal of Science, Environment and Technology. 5 (6), pp. 4532-4544.
Suitability of Corncob Ash as a supplementary Cementitious Material
Kamau, J, Ahmed, A, Hirst, P and Kangwa, J (2016). Suitability of Corncob Ash as a supplementary Cementitious Material. International Journal of Materials Science and Engineering. 4 (4), pp. 215-228. https://doi.org/10.17706/ijmse.2016.4.4.215-228