Fathers’ presence in the birth room – implications for professional practice in the Caribbean

Journal article


Ocho, O, Lootawan, K A and Moorley, CR (2018). Fathers’ presence in the birth room – implications for professional practice in the Caribbean. Contemporary Nurse. 54 (6), pp. 617-629.
AuthorsOcho, O, Lootawan, K A and Moorley, CR
Abstract

Aims or Objectives: This study explored the perspectives of Obstetricians and Registered Nurses/Midwives on the presence of expectant fathers in the birth room.

Methods: A qualitative research design was used to explore perceptions and attitudes of Obstetricians and Registered Nurses/Midwives. Data were collected using five focus group and five key informant interviews and analysed using van Manen’s [2007. Phenomenology of practice. Phenomenology & Practice, 1(1), 11–30] interpretative phenomenological approach.

Results: Four themes emerged (i) perception of the Obstetrician/Registered Nurse/Midwife, (ii) demands on the practitioner, (iii) support for staff and (iv) potential challenges for practice. While participants held positive views, the nature of the birth experience could have negative implications for themselves and expectant fathers. Poor communication could exacerbate negative perceptions in emergency settings.

Conclusions: The presence of expectant fathers in the delivery room could have a positive impact on the birth experience for mothers, fathers and health professionals in the Caribbean. However, it could be challenging in emergencies.

Year2018
JournalContemporary Nurse
Journal citation54 (6), pp. 617-629
PublisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
ISSN1839-3535
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/10376178.2018.1552524
Publication dates
Print30 Nov 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited21 Jan 2019
Accepted20 Nov 2018
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8687z

Accepted author manuscript

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