Novel non-thermal food preservation technology: the science and industrial application of high pressure, pulsed electric field and cold plasma

Book chapter


Aouzelleg, A. (2016). Novel non-thermal food preservation technology: the science and industrial application of high pressure, pulsed electric field and cold plasma. in: Hingley, M.K., Angel R.J., Memery J. and Vanhamme J. (ed.) A Stakeholder Approach to Managing Food Gower Publishing Ltd. pp. 42-44
AuthorsAouzelleg, A.
EditorsHingley, M.K., Angel R.J., Memery J. and Vanhamme J.
Abstract

This chapter looks at non-thermal processing of food. Heat processing has been a main preservation method for many years but has many disadvantages, such as adverse organoleptic
changes and loss of nutritional properties. This and other factors have resulted in active research
in new technologies of food preservation, particularly non-thermal ones. Three promising
non-thermal methods are reviewed, namely high-pressure processing (HPP), pulsed electric
field (PEF) and cold plasma (CP). These technologies have been chosen as they are at different
stages of development and application. HPP is the most mature technology with hundreds
of applications, supported by a number of established research groups around the world; PEF
has few applications, while CP is still at the laboratory stage. The questions we will answer
are: how sound is the science behind these techniques? What are the elements that are likely
to help or hinder their implementation and success? Will they be niche technologies in terms
of product and market or will they fi nd global applications?
The science and technology behind HPP, PEF and CP will be examined first, followed by
reviews of the factors affecting their development and successful application. These will be
looked at from the points of view of the three main stakeholders, i.e., academics, industrial
managers and consumers.

Keywordsnon-thermal preservation, high pressure, pulsed electric field, cold plasma, new technology implementation.
Page range42-44
Year2016
Book titleA Stakeholder Approach to Managing Food
PublisherGower Publishing Ltd
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ISBN9781315565262
Publication dates
PrintAug 2016
Publication process dates
Accepted2015
Deposited25 Feb 2022
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