Differential scanning calorimetry study of pressure/temperature processed beta-lactoglobulin: effect of dextran sulphate

Journal article


Aouzelleg, A. and Bull L-A (2004). Differential scanning calorimetry study of pressure/temperature processed beta-lactoglobulin: effect of dextran sulphate. Food research international. 37 (10), pp. 933-940. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2004.06.007
AuthorsAouzelleg, A. and Bull L-A
Abstract

-lactoglobulin at pH 7 in the presence or absence of dextran sulphate (1:1 weight ratio) was
subjected to a combined pressure and temperature treatment (pressures up to 280 MPa, temperature up to
60°C and time up to 30 minutes). The effect of the treatment was assessed post-processing using differential
scanning calorimetry. The thermograms in absence of dextran sulphate were very broad with possibly a
shoulder on the low temperature side and showed a decrease in calorimetric enthalpy as the intensity of
treatment increased. In the presence of dextran sulphate the thermograms had a much sharper shape. The
calorimetric enthalpy was reduced further than in the absence of dextran sulphate. This demonstrated that the
polysaccharide sensitised the protein to the combined treatment. Treatment with pressure and temperature
alone demonstrated that dextran sulphate sensitised the protein structure to pressure. The species created by
the combined process could be in the molten globule state and possess improved functional properties. Also
the operating parameters applied could potentially be conditions for improved functionality.

Keywordspressure, temperature, protein, polysaccharide, molten globule, functionality, food processing
Year2004
JournalFood research international
Journal citation37 (10), pp. 933-940
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0963-9969
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2004.06.007
Web address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0963996904001413
Publication dates
Online01 Sep 2004
Publication process dates
Accepted22 Jun 2004
Deposited14 Feb 2022
Accepted author manuscript
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Open
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