Quitting Without Reporting Having Tried: Findings From a National Survey

Journal article


Brown, J, Vangeli, E, Fidler, JA, Raupach, T and West, R (2014). Quitting Without Reporting Having Tried: Findings From a National Survey. Journal of Smoking Cessation. 10 (2), pp. 141 - 145.
AuthorsBrown, J, Vangeli, E, Fidler, JA, Raupach, T and West, R
Abstract

Background: It is assumed that smokers rarely quit without 'attempting' to do so but the assumption does not appear to have been adequately tested. This study assessed the prevalence of reporting having stopped without reporting a quit attempt and the reasons given for this discrepancy. Methods: Data were collected from ex-smokers who said they had quit within the last 12 months during nationally representative household surveys conducted monthly between 2006-12. Results: Of the 1,892 ex-smokers who said that they had quit within the last 12 months, 13.9% (95%CI = 12.4%-15.5%) reported having made no serious quit attempts in that period. In a sub-group of 24 smokers who were asked why they had reported stopping without also reporting an attempt, nine cited inconsistency over timing; three reported stopping without attempting to do so; four did not consider it an 'attempt' because they had succeeded; and six had not ruled out the occasional cigarette in the future. Conclusions: A substantial minority of people who report having stopped in the past year may fail to report a corresponding quit attempt. However, quitting smoking without considering that one has tried appears to be rare. Instead, the most common reason for the discrepancy is inconsistent reporting of the timing of quit attempts. Copyright © The Author(s), published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Australian Academic Press Pty Ltd 2014.

Year2014
JournalJournal of Smoking Cessation
Journal citation10 (2), pp. 141 - 145
PublisherCambridge University Press
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1017/jsc.2013.41
Publication dates
Print29 Jan 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited10 Apr 2017
Accepted29 Jan 2014
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8787q

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