A systematic review of factors associated with non-adherence to treatment for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

Journal article


Vangeli, E, Bakhshi, S, Baker, A, Fisher, A, Bucknor, D, Mrowietz, U, Östör, AJK, Peyrin-Biroulet, L, Lacerda, AP and Weinman, J (2015). A systematic review of factors associated with non-adherence to treatment for immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Advances in Therapy. 32 (11), pp. 983 - 1028. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12325-015-0256-7
AuthorsVangeli, E, Bakhshi, S, Baker, A, Fisher, A, Bucknor, D, Mrowietz, U, Östör, AJK, Peyrin-Biroulet, L, Lacerda, AP and Weinman, J
Abstract

Background: Non-adherence impacts negatively on patient health outcomes and has associated economic costs. Understanding drivers of treatment adherence in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases is key for the development of effective strategies to tackle non-adherence. Objective: To identify factors associated with treatment non-adherence across diseases in three clinical areas: rheumatology, gastroenterology, and dermatology. Design: Systematic review Data sources: Articles published in PubMed, Science Direct, PsychINFO and the Cochrane Library from 1 January 1980 to 14 February 2014. Study selection: Studies were eligible if they included patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, or psoriasis and included statistics to examine associations of factors with non-adherence. Data extraction: Data were extracted by the first reviewer using a standardised 23-item form and verified by a second/ third reviewer. Quality assessment was carried out for each study using a 16-item quality checklist. Results: 73 studies were identified for inclusion in the review. Demographic or clinical factors were not consistently associated with non-adherence. Limited evidence was found for an association between non-adherence and treatment factors such as dosing frequency. Consistent associations with adherence were found for psychosocial factors, with the strongest evidence for the impact of the healthcare professional-patient relationship, perceptions of treatment concerns and depression, lower treatment self-efficacy and necessity beliefs, and practical barriers to treatment. Conclusions: While examined in only a minority of studies, the strongest evidence found for non-adherence were psychosocial factors. Interventions designed to address these factors may be most effective in tackling treatment non-adherence.

Year2015
JournalAdvances in Therapy
Journal citation32 (11), pp. 983 - 1028
PublisherSpringer Verlag (Germany)
ISSN1865-8652
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1007/s12325-015-0256-7
Publication dates
Print07 Nov 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Jan 2017
Accepted14 Jul 2015
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/875q7

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Vangeli et al., 2015. Adv Ther.pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

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