‘Westminster’s wingman’? Shadow chancellor as a strategic and coveted political role

Journal article


Barber, S (2015). ‘Westminster’s wingman’? Shadow chancellor as a strategic and coveted political role. British Politics. 11 (2), pp. 184-204.
AuthorsBarber, S
Abstract

A focal job of Westminster opposition, there is nevertheless a dearth of published analysis on the job of Shadow Chancellor. This article argues that the Shadow Chancellor is distinctive because of its strategic power over opposition policy and other shadow portfolios and offers a critique of the post for perhaps the first time. The article shows that: most Shadow Chancellors have leadership ambitions but demonstrates that their position is intertwined with that of leader; that they are unlikely to be reshuffled by the leader who appointed them; and, that new leaders usually appoint new Shadow Chancellors. Drawing on various data about the behaviour of post holders, it demonstrates that the Shadow Chancellor occupies a central coordinating role alongside the opposition leader and supports the ‘Westminster Model’ by acting as a combative critic of government and grounding leadership in the collegiality of Parliament. Nonetheless, it also shows that the Shadow Chancellor’s profile is strongest outside Westminster, in projecting the economic credibility of an alternative government.

Keywordsshadow chancellor; leadership; opposition; parliament; Westminster model; 1606 Political Science; Political Science & Public Administration
Year2015
JournalBritish Politics
Journal citation11 (2), pp. 184-204
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1057%2Fbp.2015.33
Publication dates
Print10 Aug 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited25 Oct 2018
Accepted29 Jan 2015
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8762z

  • 0
    total views
  • 6
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 3
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Stretched but not snapped: constitutional lessons from the 2010 coalition government in Britain
Barber, S (2014). Stretched but not snapped: constitutional lessons from the 2010 coalition government in Britain. Commonwealth and Comparative Politics. 52 (4), pp. 473-492.
Jumping off the cliff?
Barber, S and Jones, A (2017). Jumping off the cliff? Local Economy. 32 (3), pp. 153-155.
Market(ing) the small. How does marketing work for UK SMEs?
Barber, S, Bennett, DR and Graham, C (2016). Market(ing) the small. How does marketing work for UK SMEs? LSBU Summer School 2016. London 11 - 15 Jul 2016 London South Bank University.
Arise, Careerless Politician: The Rise of the Professional Party Leader
Barber, S (2013). Arise, Careerless Politician: The Rise of the Professional Party Leader. Politics. 34 (1), pp. 23-31.
London Exceptionalism and the Challenge of Brexit
Barber, S (2016). London Exceptionalism and the Challenge of Brexit. British Politics Review. 11 (3) (3), pp. 22-23.
Putting theory into theory: Thematic value of research in public administration teaching
Barber, S and Luke, P (2015). Putting theory into theory: Thematic value of research in public administration teaching. Teaching Public Administration. 34 (1), pp. 96-108.
The Brexit Environment Demands that Deliberative Democracy Meets Inclusive Growth
Barber, S (2017). The Brexit Environment Demands that Deliberative Democracy Meets Inclusive Growth. Local Economy.
Westminster, Governance and the Politics of Policy Inaction: Do Nothing
Barber, S (2016). Westminster, Governance and the Politics of Policy Inaction: Do Nothing. Palgrave Macmillan.