The Brexit Environment Demands that Deliberative Democracy Meets Inclusive Growth

Journal article


Barber, S (2017). The Brexit Environment Demands that Deliberative Democracy Meets Inclusive Growth. Local Economy.
AuthorsBarber, S
Abstract

This article proposes the convergence of two concepts both as intrinsically useful and to help explain the ‘Brexit environment’. Deliberative democracy and inclusive growth have existed separately in different disciplines and this article identifies and combines their core virtues for the first time to argue that it is difficult to conceive of a deliberative democratic system that fails to enable inclusive economic growth. It reassesses the divisions exposed in the wake of the referendum on UK membership of the EU to demonstrate the deliberative and inclusive shortcomings of Britain’s political economy and shows the weakness of the Westminster model which has myopically focussed on aggregate economic outcomes and vote at the expense of broader participation and voice. As a result many citizens have found themselves excluded and opportunities for innovation, enterprise and skill development inhibited. To achieve more sustainable business, a stronger economy and greater social justice the article concludes normatively with the case for reform in the direction of a more deliberative democracy set in local economies capable of widening participation in economic success.

Keywords1205 Urban And Regional Planning; 1402 Applied Economics; 1604 Human Geography; Urban & Regional Planning
Year2017
JournalLocal Economy
PublisherSAGE Publications
ISSN0269-0942
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/0269094217705360
Publication dates
Print08 May 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited03 Apr 2017
Accepted28 Mar 2017
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86z6v

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