The views of older people and health professionals about dignity in acute hospital care.

Journal article


Tauber-Gilmore, M, Addis, G, Zahran, Z, Black, S, Baillie, L, Procter, S and Norton, C (2017). The views of older people and health professionals about dignity in acute hospital care. Journal of Clinical Nursing. 27 (1-2), pp. 223-234. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13877
AuthorsTauber-Gilmore, M, Addis, G, Zahran, Z, Black, S, Baillie, L, Procter, S and Norton, C
Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To report the findings from interviews conducted as part of a wider study on interventions to support dignified care in older people in acute hospital care. The data in this study present the interview data. BACKGROUND: Dignity is a complex concept. Despite a plethora of recommendations on how to achieve dignified care, it remains unclear how to attain this in practice and what the priorities of patients and staff are in relation to dignity. DESIGN: A purposive sample of older patients and staff took part in semi-structured interviews and gave their insight on the meaning of dignity and examples of what sustains and breaches a patient's dignity in acute hospital care. METHOD: Thirteen patients and 38 healthcare professionals in a single metropolitan hospital in the UK interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and underwent a thematic analysis. RESULTS: The meaning of dignity was broadly agreed on by patients and staff. Three broad themes were identified: the meaning of dignity, staffing level and its impact on dignity, and organisational culture and dignity. Registered staff of all healthcare discipline and student nurses report very little training on dignity or care of the older person. CONCLUSION: There remain inconsistencies in the application of dignified care. Staff behaviour, a lack of training and the organisational processes continue to result in breaches to dignity of older people. Clinical nurses have a major role in ensuring dignified care for older people in hospital. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: There needs to be systematic dignity-related training with regular refreshers. This education coupled with measures to change the cultural attitudes in an organisation towards older peoples' care should result in long-term improvements in the level of dignified care. Hospital managers have an important role in changing system to ensure that staff deliver the levels of care they aspire to.

KeywordsHumans; Attitude of Health Personnel; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Health Personnel; Health Services for the Aged; Organizational Culture; Delivery of Health Care; Female; Male; Interviews as Topic; acute care; dignity; healthcare professionals; older people; patient's experience; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Attitude of Health Personnel; Delivery of Health Care; Female; Health Personnel; Health Services for the Aged; Humans; Interviews as Topic; Male; Organizational Culture; 1110 Nursing; 1701 Psychology; Nursing
Year2017
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Journal citation27 (1-2), pp. 223-234
PublisherWiley
ISSN1365-2702
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.13877
Publication dates
Print10 Aug 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited14 Nov 2018
Accepted06 May 2017
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Additional information

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Tauber-Gilmore, M., Addis, G., Zahran, Z., Black, S., Baillie, L., Procter, S., and Norton, C. (2017). The views of older people and health professionals about dignity in acute hospital care. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(1-2), 223-234 which has been published in final form at 10.1111/jocn.13877. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

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