Medical approaches to suffering are limited, so why critique Improving Access to Psychological Therapies from the same ideology.

Journal article


Binnie, J (2018). Medical approaches to suffering are limited, so why critique Improving Access to Psychological Therapies from the same ideology. Journal of health psychology. 23 (9), pp. 1159-1162.
AuthorsBinnie, J
Abstract

Although the article by Scott rightly questions the dynamics of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies system and re-examines the recovery rates, finding quite shocking results, his recommendations are ultimately flawed. There is a strong critique of the diagnostic procedures in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, but the answer is not to diagnose more rigorously and to adhere more strictly to a manualised approach to psychotherapy. The opposite may be required. Alternatives to the medical model of distress offer a less stigmatising and more human approach to helping people with their problems. Perhaps psychological therapists and the people they work alongside would be better served by a psychological approach rather than a psychiatric one.

KeywordsImproving Access to Psychological Therapies; commentary; critique; diagnosis; medical model; 1701 Psychology; 1702 Cognitive Science; 1302 Curriculum And Pedagogy; Public Health
Year2018
JournalJournal of health psychology
Journal citation23 (9), pp. 1159-1162
PublisherLondon South Bank University
ISSN1359-1053
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1177/1359105318769323
Publication dates
Print10 Apr 2018
Publication process dates
Deposited10 May 2018
Accepted28 Mar 2018
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86v5v

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