The relevance and application of empirical research methods to the study of international crimes

Book chapter


Mylonaki, E (2014). The relevance and application of empirical research methods to the study of international crimes. in: Bantekas, I and Mylonaki, E (ed.) Criminological Approaches to International Criminal Law Cambridge University Press (CUP). pp. 50-67
AuthorsMylonaki, E
EditorsBantekas, I and Mylonaki, E
Abstract

© Cambridge University Press 2014. The international criminalization of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes has been followed by a vast amount of published work on the legal instruments and institutions dealing with such crimes and the procedural aspects of their prosecution at national and international level. Most of the relevant work relies on secondary data analysis rather than the collection of primary data and the use of criminological research methods. In fact, the discipline of criminology has traditionally excluded violations of international criminal law from its scope, restricting itself to common crime and violence such as homicide, gang crime, domestic violence and other types of ordinary (national) criminal activity. It is only recently that criminologists have gradually started paying attention to international crimes and calling for the development of a new sub-branch of criminological research, a so-called international criminology, with the aim of examining crime and justice beyond national boundaries. The examination of international crimes through criminological lenses has resulted in broadening the horizons of the research methods employed in order to fully appreciate the nature of international crimes. This is evident in the various studies conducted to address – on a quantitative level – the prevalence of international crimes, the etiology of offending at a micro and macro level, the impact of the offence on the victim and the legal reaction to international criminality. This chapter focuses on the application of criminological empirical research methods to the study of international crimes by providing insights into the different ways in which data can be collected for research thereto. It is not the aim of the chapter to produce a full account of the various social science research methods but only to identify particular problems potentially encountered by anyone conducting research on international crimes, especially as this relates to data collection for qualitative or quantitative analysis. The chapter is divided into two principal sections. The first highlights the relevance of the application of criminological research methods to the study of international crimes and gross violations of human rights and reinforces the arguments for the inclusion of the notion of international crimes within the realm of empirical research. The second demonstrates the practical application of quantitative and qualitative research methods in the study of international crimes and indicates the areas where empirical research is relevant.

Page range50-67
Year2014
Book titleCriminological Approaches to International Criminal Law
PublisherCambridge University Press (CUP)
ISBN9781107446700
Publication dates
Print01 Nov 2014
Publication process dates
Accepted01 Oct 2014
Deposited24 Nov 2020
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107446700.004
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8v61v

Download files

  • 110
    total views
  • 47
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

The expanded doctrine of self-defence & international security assistance - the case of Afghanistan 2001 – 2020
Mylonaki, E. and Burton, T. (2022). The expanded doctrine of self-defence & international security assistance - the case of Afghanistan 2001 – 2020 . International Law Research. 11 (1), pp. 335-350. https://doi.org/10.5539/ilr.v11n1p335
From European Union student mobility to lockdown: “Virtual study mobility” in the COVID-19 era and a case study of transnational law in an international classroom delivered online
Koo, J., James, C. and Mylonaki, E. (2021). From European Union student mobility to lockdown: “Virtual study mobility” in the COVID-19 era and a case study of transnational law in an international classroom delivered online. in: Covid 19 and an Emerging World of Ad Hoc Geographies Springer.
Domestic Violence: Collateral Damage in the Era of Pandemic
Mylonaki, E (2020). Domestic Violence: Collateral Damage in the Era of Pandemic. Quarterly Journal of Women’s Health and Nursing. 1 (1), pp. 1-3.
Terrorism: international perspectives
Mylonaki, E (2019). Terrorism: international perspectives. in: Morgan, RD (ed.) The Sage Encyclopedia of Criminal Psychology Sage.
The boundaries of the drone discourse in international law
Mylonaki, E and Burton, T (2017). The boundaries of the drone discourse in international law. International Journal of Terrorism and Political Hot Spots. 12 (1), pp. 1-12.
An Overview of the Western African Response to the International Counter-terrorism Legal Framework
Mylonaki, E. (2015). An Overview of the Western African Response to the International Counter-terrorism Legal Framework. 2015 (ii), pp. 18-27.