“tentacular worlding” an assemblage of dance, technology and lived experience through embodied relational biofeedback and materials of the human and non-humankind.

Conference presentation


Ginslov, J. (2019). “tentacular worlding” an assemblage of dance, technology and lived experience through embodied relational biofeedback and materials of the human and non-humankind. 'On the Notion of Practice' . Dansehallerne Copenhagen 08 - 10 May 2019
AuthorsGinslov, J.
TypeConference presentation
Abstract

I am a final year practice as research or PaR or practice as research PhD candidate at London South Bank University and currently developing a prototype, in collaboration with Daniel Spikol from Malmö University, to investigate tentacular worlding. My theoretical framework is inspired mainly by the writing of phenomenologist Merleau-Ponty, post phenomenologist Don Ihde, new feminist materialists Rosi Braidotti, Jane Bennett and Donna Haraway and new post humanist Clare Colebrook. This supports my conceptual framework of a tentacular worlding through which I explore unseen yet felt lively materials which could contribute to creativity, health and well-being or a deeper understanding of dance and meditation techniques. Inspired by Robin Nelson (2013), Alvesson and Skoldberg (2009) and Tim Ingold (2011), I have used self-reflexive and hermeneutic methodologies to collapse anthropocentric ways of seeing the dancing body, with ways of feeling whilst embodying biosensor technologies.

As “knowledge cannot be separated from the knower” (Alvesson and Skoldberg 2009), my methods require that I situate myself within this worlding as both performer and researcher, using an embodiment of biosensor technologies. Being self-reflexive, these tools reflect back at me my lived experience of Deep Flow, a fascia release and meditation dance technique that I have developed over the last three years. I have also developed a process of extrusions allowing for variational flows within a system, replacing the idea of using technologies as extensions of lived experience as they do more than mediate or capture the moving body. They extrude my embodied relations between human and non-human materials within a relational system that both feels and reveals. Above all it collapses binary relations of selfhood as I am both the subject and object of this investigation, using my own heart rate variability in relation to my lived experience of Deep Flow using a phenomenology and embodiment of technology.

For this Artistic Research Lab, I aim to reveal the journey I undertook over four Pilot Studies using my own personal, tacit and phenomenological experiences that actively constructed my worlding, through movement, pre-reflective perception and a phenomenology of technology.

Year2019
Web address (URL)https://www.dansehallerne.dk/en/performance/on-the-notion-of-practice/
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Publication process dates
Accepted09 May 2019
Deposited06 Nov 2020
Web address (URL) of conference proceedingshttps://www.dansehallerne.dk/en/performance/on-the-notion-of-practice/
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8v0yx

Download files


Accepted author manuscript
PRESENTATIONArtResLabOn the Notion of Prac 05 May 2018 .pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

  • 11
    total views
  • 1
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Conspiracy Archives a process archive of an archival process
Ginslov, J., Kozel, S., Guðjónsdóttir, M.S. and Lim, K. (2019). Conspiracy Archives a process archive of an archival process. Researching (in/as) Motion: A Resource Collection, Artistic Doctorates in Europe. 10.
Temporal Scaffolding: A Collaborative and Networked Infrastructure of Techne, Screendance, AR, Affect, Audiences and Smart Mobile Devices in the Project AffeXity
Ginslov, J. (2016). Temporal Scaffolding: A Collaborative and Networked Infrastructure of Techne, Screendance, AR, Affect, Audiences and Smart Mobile Devices in the Project AffeXity . in: Intersecting Art and Technology in Practice. Techne/Technique /Technology. New York Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group). pp. 112-127