The effect of DNA recovery on the subsequent quality of latent fingermarks: a pseudo-operational trial

Journal article


Fieldhouse, S., Parsons, R., Bleay, S. and Walton-Williams, L. (2019). The effect of DNA recovery on the subsequent quality of latent fingermarks: a pseudo-operational trial. Forensic Science International.
AuthorsFieldhouse, S., Parsons, R., Bleay, S. and Walton-Williams, L.
Abstract

The recovery of fingermarks and DNA from the same location at a crime scene can be problematic because of contamination issues associated with powdering or laboratory-based visualisation processes and/or the perceived destructive impact of commonly employed ‘swabbing’ approaches to DNA recovery. Previous research in a controlled environment demonstrated that it was possible to recover DNA and latent fingermarks from the same location on various substrates when an adhesive approach to DNA recovery was used. The aim of this research was to conduct a pseudo-operational trial into the dual recovery of DNA and fingermarks using gel lifters for DNA recovery. Participants were asked to voluntarily and anonymously donate a wide variety of porous and non-porous substrates post handling. No instruction as to fingermark deposition nor environmental storage was provided. BVDA gel lifters were applied to the substrates to replicate DNA recovery followed by the application of fingermark visualisation processes. The number and quality of the fingermarks was established using a grading approach. Application factors were also investigated to consider the effects of user variation. The results demonstrated that it was possible to recover DNA and fingermarks considered to be capable of supporting an identification. Fingermark quality post lifting was dependant on the substrates used. The weight applied to the gel during its application was a lesser contributing factor than the duration of its contact with the surface. There was a greater chance of leaving the fingermarks unaltered with the application of a low weight and instantaneous retraction.

Year2019
JournalForensic Science International
PublisherElsevier
ISSN1872-6283
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1016/j.forsciint.2019.110076
Web address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0379073819304888?via%3Dihub
Publication dates
Online26 Nov 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted22 Nov 2019
Deposited28 Nov 2019
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
File Access Level
Open
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8897y

Accepted author manuscript

  • 5
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

A comparative evaluation of the disulfur dinitride process for the visualisation of fingermarks on metal surfaces
Bleay, S, Kelly, P, King, R and Thorngate, S (2019). A comparative evaluation of the disulfur dinitride process for the visualisation of fingermarks on metal surfaces. Science and Justice.
Fingerprinting: the UK landscape: processes, stakeholders, and interactions
Earwaker, H C, Charlton, D and Bleay, S (2015). Fingerprinting: the UK landscape: processes, stakeholders, and interactions. Horsham, West Sussex Knowledge Transfer Network.
Commentary for Chapter 1: Mass Spectrometry Methods for the Recovery of Forensic Intelligence from Fingermarks
Bleay, S (2019). Commentary for Chapter 1: Mass Spectrometry Methods for the Recovery of Forensic Intelligence from Fingermarks. in: Francese, S (ed.) Emerging Technologies for the Analysis of Forensic Traces Springer.
Assessing phosphomolybdic acid as a fingermark enhancement reagent
Davis, LWL, Bleay, SM and Kelly, PF (2018). Assessing phosphomolybdic acid as a fingermark enhancement reagent. Journal of Forensic Identification. 68 (2), pp. 257-280.
Visualisation of latent fingermarks on polymer banknotes using copper vacuum metal deposition: A preliminary study
Davis, LWL, Kelly, PF, King, RSP and Bleay, SM (2016). Visualisation of latent fingermarks on polymer banknotes using copper vacuum metal deposition: A preliminary study. Forensic Science International. 266, pp. e86-e92.
The influence of materials on fingermark enhancement
Downham, R and Bleay, S (2016). The influence of materials on fingermark enhancement. Materials World. 24.
Home Office Fingerprint Source Book
Bandey, H, Bleay, S, Bowman, V, Downham, R, Sears, V, Gibson, A, Selway, C, Ramadani, J and Ciuksza, T (2018). Home Office Fingerprint Source Book. London Home Office.
Introduction: Fingerprint Development Techniques: Theory and Application
Bleay, SM, Croxton, RS and De Puit, M (2018). Introduction: Fingerprint Development Techniques: Theory and Application. in: Fingerprint Development Techniques: Theory and Application Chichester John Wiley & Sons Ltd. pp. 1-500
Fingermark visualisation on metal surfaces: An initial investigation of the influence of surface condition on process effectiveness
Pitera, M, Sears, VG, Bleay, SM and Park, S (2018). Fingermark visualisation on metal surfaces: An initial investigation of the influence of surface condition on process effectiveness. Science and Justice. 58 (5), pp. 372-383.
Visualising the past – An evaluation of processes and sequences for fingermark recovery from old documents
Bleay, S, Fitzgerald, L, Sears, V and Kent, T (2018). Visualising the past – An evaluation of processes and sequences for fingermark recovery from old documents. Science and Justice. 59 (2), pp. 125-137.
An evaluation of the effect of incorporating metal salts into 1,8 diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) formulations for fingermark enhancement
Mayse, K, Sears, VG, Nicolasora, N and Bleay, S (2019). An evaluation of the effect of incorporating metal salts into 1,8 diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) formulations for fingermark enhancement. Science and Justice.