Fingerprinting: the UK landscape: processes, stakeholders, and interactions

Technical report


Earwaker, H C, Charlton, D and Bleay, S (2015). Fingerprinting: the UK landscape: processes, stakeholders, and interactions. Horsham, West Sussex Knowledge Transfer Network.
AuthorsEarwaker, H C, Charlton, D and Bleay, S
TypeTechnical report
Abstract

The aim of this report is to provide a current view of the landscape of the fingerprinting domain, within
the United Kingdom. This report will identify the key stakeholders, within UK fingerprinting, and determine the current channels of communication, knowledge transfer, and innovation across the UK by
delivering the following elements:
• A description of the history of fingerprinting in the forensic domain, and the process followed during
the recovery and comparison of fingerprint evidence;
• A summary of the key stakeholders influencing this process;
• A description of the role of these key stakeholders within the fingerprint domain including:
◊ The role of policing stakeholders;
◊ The role of training and accreditation bodies;
• Current fingerprint research and development;
• A number of case studies illustrating examples of knowledge transfer between stakeholders and
innovation within the fingerprinting domain; and
• Gap analysis leading to recommendations for the Forensic Science Special Interest Group to facilitate increased communication and innovation in this domain
This report has been compiled following consultation with a number of specialists within UK fingerprinting. However, it is acknowledged that this report does not represent the views of all contributors and that
there are often differences of opinion and local alternatives to structures and procedures, which mean
that the information contained within this report should be taken as a guide only. This report has been
published to allow further consultation within the fingerprint community.
Terminology specific to the fingerprint domain included within the report is defined in the glossary of
domain specific terms at the back of the document. Further, there are additional terms listed in the glossary that are not directly referred to in the main body of the text, but may be of benefit to those unfamiliar
with fingerprinting terminology.

Year2015
PublisherKnowledge Transfer Network
Place of publicationHorsham, West Sussex
Publication dates
Print01 Apr 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited25 Apr 2019
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/876y1

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