Parenting cultures: change and transmission between generations of African-Caribbean and white British mixed families in London

Conference item


Bauer, E (2016). Parenting cultures: change and transmission between generations of African-Caribbean and white British mixed families in London. International conference on “Parenting and Personhood: Cross--cultural perspectives on expertise, family life and risk management”. University of Kent, UK, Centre for Parenting Culture 22 - 24 Jun 2016 London South Bank University.
AuthorsBauer, E
Abstract

Social values such as attitudes to social respectability (including attitudes to religion, sexuality and marriage), education and social mobility, gender divisions of roles and attitude towards different ethnic groups are general attitudes which are often transmitted between generations within families. Social values often find their roots within the culture in which the individual was born and raised. These values are shaped and influenced by parents, grandparents and other members in the extended family networks including fictive kin members, and are further reinforced by the wider social structures. Factors such as changing political and social climate (for example exposure to global markets and global crises) can play significant roles in the transmission, or change of social values among individuals within families. Migration from one culture to another and mixed sociability are also key factors which alter the ways in which values are transmitted between generations within families. This paper is drawn from a qualitative study of 34 mixed Anglo African-Caribbean and white British extended families in London, across three to four generations from the 1950s to mid-2000s. It is a comparative paper that explores attitudes to social values among the Anglo African-Caribbean and the white British families, and their transmission between generations in each group. It informs of the family value systems from which the individuals in mixed-heritage families came, and shows how these values are adapted and negotiated within the mixed families. In other words, it shows what values the individuals in the mixed-heritage families brought with them from their families of origin and what values they have rejected, in the process of creating their own value systems which work for their unique situations as mixed families.

Year2016
PublisherLondon South Bank University
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
File description
Abstract
Publication dates
Print22 Jun 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited08 Jun 2017
Accepted15 Jan 2016
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/87397

  • 1
    total views
  • 0
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Education, work and home ownership as markers of being a good citizen: Caribbean mothers practice citizenship at local and transnational levels
Bauer, E (2014). Education, work and home ownership as markers of being a good citizen: Caribbean mothers practice citizenship at local and transnational levels. International conference: Migrant mothers caring for the future: creative interventions in making new citizens. London south Bank University, London, UK 18 - 19 Sep 2014 London South Bank University.
Creolized family patterns among divorced mixed couples: Caribbean and White British families in London
Bauer, E (2014). Creolized family patterns among divorced mixed couples: Caribbean and White British families in London. New Research Challenges on Intermarriage and Mixedness in Europe and Beyond,. University Paris Sorbonne, Paris, France 12 - 13 Nov 2015 London South Bank University.
Language brokering, mediated manipulations, and the role of the interpreter/translator
Bauer, E (2016). Language brokering, mediated manipulations, and the role of the interpreter/translator. University of Strasbourg Winterschool « Biographical evaluation of language policies by migrants in Europe. University of Strasbourg, France 21 - 26 Nov 2016 London South Bank University.
Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners
Bauer, E (2017). Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners. Goldsmith’s, University of London Anthropology Dep’t Spring summer Seminar series “The Politics of Embodiment”. Goldsmith's, University of London, UK 01 - 01 Mar 2017 London South Bank University.
1) “Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners”.
Bauer, E (2017). 1) “Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners”. The Loving Day conference on “Power, Intimacy and the State: Mixed Families in Europe and Beyond”,. University of Amsterdam and Maastricht University, NL. 12 - 13 Jun 2017 London South Bank University.
Racialized citizenship, respectability and mothering among Caribbean mothers in Britain
Bauer, E (2017). Racialized citizenship, respectability and mothering among Caribbean mothers in Britain. Ethnic and Racial Studies. 41 (1), pp. 151-169.
Language brokering: mediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translator
Bauer, E (2017). Language brokering: mediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translator. in: Antonini, R, Cirillo, L, Rossato, L and Torresi, I (ed.) Non-professional Interpreting and Translation: State of the art and future of an emerging field of research Amsterdam, The Netherlands John Benjamins.
Group Analysis in Practice: Narrative Approaches
Phoenix, A, Brannen, J, Elliot, H, Smithson, J, Morris, P, Smart, C, Barlow, A and Bauer, E (2016). Group Analysis in Practice: Narrative Approaches. Forum: Qualitative Social Research / Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung. 17 (2).
Practising kinship care: Children as language brokers in migrant families
Bauer, E (2015). Practising kinship care: Children as language brokers in migrant families. Childhood. 23 (1), pp. 22 - 36.