Racialized citizenship, respectability and mothering among Caribbean mothers in Britain

Journal article


Bauer, E (2017). Racialized citizenship, respectability and mothering among Caribbean mothers in Britain. Ethnic and Racial Studies. 41 (1), pp. 151-169.
AuthorsBauer, E
Abstract

Abstract Holy matrimony, nuclear family, attending church, education and good manners are typical markers of respectability. These Victorian middle-class ideological values were transported to the British Caribbean region after emancipation of slavery by missionaries and priests aiming to “civilize” the ex-slaves. As social values they were often transformed or met in opposition with a more complex set of cultural and social values within Caribbean creole communities. Overtime, however, some individuals adopted these Euro-centric values, thus prescribing to a form of racialized citizenship. Upon migration to Britain in the 1960s, some migrant mothers endeavoured to transmit these values among their children, in an effort to integrate and develop a sense of identity and belonging, but also as modes of resistance to experiences of racism and discrimination. This paper illustrates the tensions experienced by two migrant Caribbean mothers, and their concerns that the social values of respectability are being lost among their offspring.

KeywordsCaribbean migrant mothers; serial migration; “normativity”; racialized citizenship; social values; respectability and class
Year2017
JournalEthnic and Racial Studies
Journal citation41 (1), pp. 151-169
PublisherRoutledge
ISSN0141-9870
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1080/01419870.2017.1317826
Publication dates
Print31 May 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited03 Apr 2017
Accepted29 Mar 2017
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86z3q

  • 2
    total views
  • 22
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Education, work and home ownership as markers of being a good citizen: Caribbean mothers practice citizenship at local and transnational levels
Bauer, E (2014). Education, work and home ownership as markers of being a good citizen: Caribbean mothers practice citizenship at local and transnational levels. International conference: Migrant mothers caring for the future: creative interventions in making new citizens. London south Bank University, London, UK 18 - 19 Sep 2014 London South Bank University.
Creolized family patterns among divorced mixed couples: Caribbean and White British families in London
Bauer, E (2014). Creolized family patterns among divorced mixed couples: Caribbean and White British families in London. New Research Challenges on Intermarriage and Mixedness in Europe and Beyond,. University Paris Sorbonne, Paris, France 12 - 13 Nov 2015 London South Bank University.
Parenting cultures: change and transmission between generations of African-Caribbean and white British mixed families in London
Bauer, E (2016). Parenting cultures: change and transmission between generations of African-Caribbean and white British mixed families in London. International conference on “Parenting and Personhood: Cross--cultural perspectives on expertise, family life and risk management”. University of Kent, UK, Centre for Parenting Culture 22 - 24 Jun 2016 London South Bank University.
Language brokering, mediated manipulations, and the role of the interpreter/translator
Bauer, E (2016). Language brokering, mediated manipulations, and the role of the interpreter/translator. University of Strasbourg Winterschool « Biographical evaluation of language policies by migrants in Europe. University of Strasbourg, France 21 - 26 Nov 2016 London South Bank University.
Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners
Bauer, E (2017). Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners. Goldsmith’s, University of London Anthropology Dep’t Spring summer Seminar series “The Politics of Embodiment”. Goldsmith's, University of London, UK 01 - 01 Mar 2017 London South Bank University.
1) “Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners”.
Bauer, E (2017). 1) “Negotiating Mixed Identities: Generations of mixed African Caribbean and white Londoners”. The Loving Day conference on “Power, Intimacy and the State: Mixed Families in Europe and Beyond”,. University of Amsterdam and Maastricht University, NL. 12 - 13 Jun 2017 London South Bank University.
Language brokering: mediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translator
Bauer, E (2017). Language brokering: mediated manipulations, and the agency of the interpreter/translator. in: Antonini, R, Cirillo, L, Rossato, L and Torresi, I (ed.) Non-professional Interpreting and Translation: State of the art and future of an emerging field of research Amsterdam, The Netherlands John Benjamins.
Group Analysis in Practice: Narrative Approaches
Phoenix, A, Brannen, J, Elliot, H, Smithson, J, Morris, P, Smart, C, Barlow, A and Bauer, E (2016). Group Analysis in Practice: Narrative Approaches. Forum: Qualitative Social Research / Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung. 17 (2).
Practising kinship care: Children as language brokers in migrant families
Bauer, E (2015). Practising kinship care: Children as language brokers in migrant families. Childhood. 23 (1), pp. 22 - 36.