Rapport‐building in multiple interviews of children

Journal article


Waterhouse, Genevieve F., Ridley, Anne M., Bull, Ray, Satchell, Liam and Wilcock, R. (2023). Rapport‐building in multiple interviews of children. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 37 (6), pp. 1210-1222. https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.4116
AuthorsWaterhouse, Genevieve F., Ridley, Anne M., Bull, Ray, Satchell, Liam and Wilcock, R.
AbstractAbstractRapport‐building is key in child investigative interviews, however, recommendations of how to build rapport differ. Additionally, rapport in more complex situations: when a child is interviewed repeatedly or requires separate rapport building have not been studied. This research examined the UK's ‘Achieving Best Evidence’ guidelines for rapport‐building, which recommend conducting a neutral discussion, compared with a control condition and a separate rapport‐building session for first interviews on children's recall and well‐being (measured by state anxiety and rapport questionnaires). For second and third interviews, additional full rapport‐building sessions were compared to shortened or no rapport‐building conditions. No significant differences in children's (N = 107) recall or well‐being were found across rapport‐building conditions for all interviews. We conclude that for children who have experienced non‐traumatic events, the inclusion of a neutral discussion rapport‐building phase may not be any more beneficial for children than conducting a friendly interview.
KeywordsArts and Humanities (miscellaneous); Developmental and Educational Psychology; Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Year2023
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Journal citation37 (6), pp. 1210-1222
PublisherWiley
ISSN0888-4080
1099-0720
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1002/acp.4116
Funder/ClientLondon South Bank University
Publication dates
Online08 Aug 2023
Publication process dates
Accepted06 Jul 2023
Deposited21 Nov 2023
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/959yw

Download files

  • 11
    total views
  • 2
    total downloads
  • 1
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

What moderates the attainment gap? The effects of social identity incompatibility and practical incompatibility on the performance of students who are or are not Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic
Frings, D., Gleibs, I. H. and Ridley, A. (2019). What moderates the attainment gap? The effects of social identity incompatibility and practical incompatibility on the performance of students who are or are not Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic. Social Psychology of Education. pp. 1-18.