Multi-Sensory Ethnography and Vertical Urban Transformation: Ascending the Peckham Skyline’. Social & Cultural Geography

Journal article


Calafate-Faria, F., Jackson, E. and Benson, M. (2019). Multi-Sensory Ethnography and Vertical Urban Transformation: Ascending the Peckham Skyline’. Social & Cultural Geography. Social & Cultural Geography. 22 (4), pp. 501-522. https://doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2019.1597152
AuthorsCalafate-Faria, F., Jackson, E. and Benson, M.
Abstract

In this paper, we offer a conceptual and methodological intervention that demonstrates how multi-sensory ethnography might enrich critical analysis of vertical urban transformation. Through the lens of two sites in Peckham, southeast London—a multi-story car park and an ex-industrial warehouse complex—recently remade as leisure and retail spaces, we examine how processes and practices by which these spaces at height are designed and curated reproduce social and spatial inequalities. As we argue, in retraining the vantage point of research on verticality through attention to other senses—which we label here as non-ocular vistas—new perspectives and texture are brought to understandings of place-making, that address how power functions through the erection of physical, symbolic and sensory exclusions, and how sensorial clashes makes visible contestations over space in a changing urban environment. In this way, our contribution: (1) privileges a multi-sensory perspective in understanding how power is reproduced in and through the vertical transformation of the city; (2) intervenes in research on verticality to centre the concept of non-ocular vistas; and (3) offers a methodological innovation that make visible the subtle affects that manifest the politics of exclusion within spaces at height.

Keywordsverticality, multi-sensory ethnography, urban transformation, leisure, sensescapes
Year2019
JournalSocial & Cultural Geography
Journal citation22 (4), pp. 501-522
PublisherTaylor & Francis
ISSN1464-9365
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2019.1597152
Publication dates
Print01 Apr 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted01 Mar 2019
Deposited13 May 2022
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
Additional information

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Social & Cultural Geography on 05/04/2019, available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14649365.2019.1597152

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Accepted author manuscript
040319 Non-ocular vistas.docx
License: CC BY-NC 4.0
File access level: Open

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