Gendered, post-diasporic mobilities and the politics of blackness in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time (2016)

Journal article


Scafe, S (2019). Gendered, post-diasporic mobilities and the politics of blackness in Zadie Smith’s Swing Time (2016). Caribbean Review of Gender Studies. 13, pp. 93-120.
AuthorsScafe, S
Abstract

Zadie Smith’s novel Swing Time (2016) traverses the geographies and
temporalities of the Black Atlantic, unsettling conventional definitions of a black
African diaspora, and restlessly interrogating easy gestures of identification and
belonging. In my analysis of Smith’s text, I argue that these interconnected
spaces and the characters’ uneasy and shifting identities are representative of
post-diasporic communities and subjectivities. The novel’s representations of
female friendships, mother-daughter relationships, and professional relationships
between women, however, demonstrate that experiences of diaspora/postdiaspora are complicated by issues of gender. Forms of black dance and
African diasporic music represent the novel’s concerns with mobility and stillness;
dance is used by its young female characters as a “diasporic resource” (Nassy
Brown 2005, 42), a means of negotiating and contesting existing structures of
gender, class and culture.

Year2019
JournalCaribbean Review of Gender Studies
Journal citation13, pp. 93-120
PublisherThe University of the West Indies at St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
ISSN1995-1108
Web address (URL)https://sta.uwi.edu/crgs/june2019/index.asp
Publication dates
Print13 Jun 2019
Publication process dates
Accepted13 May 2019
Deposited19 Feb 2020
Accepted author manuscript
License
File Access Level
Open
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/89156

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