The Asset Based Health Inquiry: How best to develop social prescribing

Project report


Malby, R., Boyle, D., Wildman, J., Omar, B.S. and Smith, S. (2019). The Asset Based Health Inquiry: How best to develop social prescribing. London South Bank University.
AuthorsMalby, R., Boyle, D., Wildman, J., Omar, B.S. and Smith, S.
TypeProject report
Abstract

Phrases like ‘social prescribing’ and ‘coproduction’ speak to missing elements from mainstream healthcare – the need for broader than pharmacological solutions (social prescribing) and for sharing the responsibilities for maintaining and recovering health (coproduction). Neither of these approaches have yet been able to make the required impact on mainstream health services. The social prescribing initiative set out under the NHS long-term plan that is now being put into practice by NHS England (2019), is in some respects a vindication of our approach, developed by the Health Systems Innovation Lab at LSBU, where we have studied and promoted more humane approaches to healthcare, working closely with many of the pioneers of social prescribing in the UK. But on closer examination, we were not quite so sure the match was complete. Some of the key people who have developed the most important social innovations in primary care were nervous about it. It was not clear whether they were nervous about the language of ‘social prescribing’ or about the organisation of social prescribing, as set out in NHS policy. We organised this brief Inquiry in order to find out

Year2019
PublisherLondon South Bank University
File
Publication dates
Print09 Oct 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited22 Nov 2019
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/886v8

  • 6
    total views
  • 3
    total downloads
  • 6
    views this month
  • 1
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Challenges and insights in inter-organizational collaborative healthcare networks: an empirical case study of a place-based network
Mervyn, K, Amoo, N and Malby, R (2018). Challenges and insights in inter-organizational collaborative healthcare networks: an empirical case study of a place-based network. International Journal of Organizational Analysis.
Longitudinal Study of the Impact of the London Darzi fellowship Programmes years 1-8.
Mervyn, K, Malby, R and Meredith, G (2018). Longitudinal Study of the Impact of the London Darzi fellowship Programmes years 1-8. London London South Bank University. doi:10.18744/PUB.002634
Darzi Clinical Leadership Fellows: An Activity Theory Perspective
Malby, R, Mervyn, K and Boyle, T (2018). Darzi Clinical Leadership Fellows: An Activity Theory Perspective. Journal of Health Organization and Management. 32 (6), pp. 793-808.
NETWORKS IN HEALTHCARE Managing Complex Relationships
Malby, R and Anderson-Wallace, M Malby, B (ed.) (2016). NETWORKS IN HEALTHCARE Managing Complex Relationships. Bingley, United Kingdom Emerald.
Innovation and sustainability in a large-scale healthcare improvement collaborative – seven propositions for achieving system-wide innovation and sustainability
Malby, R, Amoo, N and Mervyn, K (2016). Innovation and sustainability in a large-scale healthcare improvement collaborative – seven propositions for achieving system-wide innovation and sustainability. International Journal of Sustainable Strategic Management. 5 (2), pp. 149 - 179.
Can Volunteering Help Create Better Health and Care. An evidence review.
Malby, R, Boyle, D and Crilly, T (2017). Can Volunteering Help Create Better Health and Care. An evidence review. London London South Bank University. doi:10.18744/PUB.001625
Introducing a Peoples Academy into Higher Education: A coproduction approach to sustained wellbeing
Hardy, SE, Malby, R, Turner, W, White, X, Hallett, N, Chalmney, C and Young, G (2018). Introducing a Peoples Academy into Higher Education: A coproduction approach to sustained wellbeing. Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning.