Dynamics of repeated interviews with children

Journal article


Waterhouse, G, Ridley, AM, Bull, R, La Rooy, D and Wilcock, R (2016). Dynamics of repeated interviews with children. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 30 (5), pp. 713-721.
AuthorsWaterhouse, G, Ridley, AM, Bull, R, La Rooy, D and Wilcock, R
Abstract

Concerns regarding repeat interviews with child witnesses include greater use of suggestive questions in later interviews due to bias, and that children may appear inconsistent and, therefore, be judged as less reliable in court. UK transcripts of first and second interviews with 21 child victims/witnesses (conducted by qualified interviewers) were coded for question types and child responses. Interviewers were consistent in their proportional use of question types across interviews. Furthermore, children were as informative in second interviews as in first, mostly providing new details consistent with their prior recall. Despite the apparent lack of training in conducting repeated interviews, no negative effects were found; second interviews appeared to be conducted as well as initial interviews, and children provided new details without many contradictions. It is suggested that when a child's testimony is paramount for an investigation, a well-conducted supplementary interview may be an effective way of gaining further investigative leads.Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

KeywordsPsychology; Cognitive Science; Marketing; Experimental Psychology
Year2016
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Journal citation30 (5), pp. 713-721
PublisherWiley: 12 months
ISSN1099-0720
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1002/acp.3246
Publication dates
Print10 Jun 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited31 May 2017
Accepted26 Apr 2016
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY-NC 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/873w5

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