Self-directed support: ten years on

Journal article


Morrow, F. and Kettle, M. (2021). Self-directed support: ten years on. Insights. 61.
AuthorsMorrow, F. and Kettle, M.
Abstract

Key Points:
It is ten years since the publication of the first national strategy for Self-directed Support (SDS).
Evidence, both from scrutiny activity and research, indicates a very mixed picture of delivery across Scotland, with some people benefitting and others not having full access
Processes for delivery of SDS are often bureaucratic and unwieldy, with the voice of the supported person not being fully heard.
In order for the goals of the SDS strategy to be fully implemented, a change of culture will be required to fully put the voice of the supported person at the heart of SDS processes.
There are significant implications for the workforce in terms of training and autonomy; real investment in education and training is required.

KeywordsSelf-directed Support; Personalisation, Social Work
Year2021
JournalInsights
Journal citation61
PublisherInstitute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (Iriss)
Web address (URL)https://www.iriss.org.uk/resources/insights/self-directed-support-ten-years
Publication dates
Print06 May 2021
Publication process dates
Deposited10 Jul 2024
Publisher's version
License
File Access Level
Open
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/96yy9

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License: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
File access level: Open

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