Context-specific understandings of uncertainty: a focus on people management practices in Mongolia

Book chapter


Manalsuren, S., Michalski, M and Sliwa, M (2022). Context-specific understandings of uncertainty: a focus on people management practices in Mongolia. in: Wood, G., Demirbag, M., Kwong, C. and Cooke, F.L (ed.) International HRM in an Uncertain World London Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group). pp. 32-59
AuthorsManalsuren, S., Michalski, M and Sliwa, M
EditorsWood, G., Demirbag, M., Kwong, C. and Cooke, F.L
Abstract

This chapter addresses the link between local understandings of uncertainty and people management practices in the under-researched and uncertain context of Mongolia. It draws on a qualitative, interpretive study of 34 top and middle managers with people management responsibilities in Mongolian organisations. We put forward the concept of a ‘mindset about uncertainty’ for examining Mongolian practitioners’ understandings of and responses to the uncertainty inherent in the country’s institutional environment. We identify four elements of the Mongolian mindset about uncertainty: (1) belief that impermanence is natural; (2) consideration of uncertainty as normal; (3) framing of uncertainty as positive; and (4) emphasis on flexibility in adapting to changing circumstances. We discuss this approach to dealing with uncertainty as a potentially valuable source of learning for Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) and International Human Resource Development (IHRD) practitioners in unstable environments.

Keywordsmindset, uncertainty, people management, Mongolia
Page range32-59
Year2022
Book titleInternational HRM in an Uncertain World
PublisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis Group)
File
License
File Access Level
Open
Place of publicationLondon
Edition1st
ISBN9781003316749
Publication dates
Print28 Nov 2022
Publication process dates
AcceptedSep 2022
Deposited12 Mar 2024
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003316749
Web address (URL)https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/edit/10.4324/9781003316749/international-hrm-uncertain-world-geoffrey-wood-mehmet-demirbag-caleb-kwong-fang-lee-cooke
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/96530

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