An Evaluation of the Return to Practice Programme (Nursing) at City University of London (2017-2018)

Project report


Barlow, S., Verey, A., Srivastava, N., York, W., Lamontagne-Godwin, F., Ellis, M., Storer, S., Abbott, S., Reynolds, L., Wasiki, M. and Simpson, A. (2019). An Evaluation of the Return to Practice Programme (Nursing) at City University of London (2017-2018). City, University of London. https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24392.67841
AuthorsBarlow, S., Verey, A., Srivastava, N., York, W., Lamontagne-Godwin, F., Ellis, M., Storer, S., Abbott, S., Reynolds, L., Wasiki, M. and Simpson, A.
TypeProject report
Abstract

In response to concerns over a predicted chronic nursing shortage recent focus has been placed on Return to Practice (RTP) programmes, which aim to increase the nursing workforce by enabling former nurses to return to the profession. In order to encourage former nurses to return to practice, it is important to understand the motivations, expectations and experiences of current returnees by evaluating RTP programmes.

Aims: To evaluate the RTP programme by exploring the views and experiences of returnees to nursing, and of the nursing staff who support them.

Methods: This was a mixed methods study: an electronic survey of all students currently or recently on the RTP programme at City, University of London; and interviews with a range of stakeholders, including returnees, mentors and senior managers, at North East London Foundation Trust (NELFT). Descriptive statistics were used to summarise quantitative responses to the survey and Framework method was employed to analyse qualitative data.

Results: Seventy-four responses to the survey were received; eight interviews were carried out with returnees, and five with NELFT staff. Overall, data suggests that the programme has been very successful: most views were positive, many were very positive. Though returnees found the course fairly challenging, they also found it largely fit for purpose. There were many useful suggestions about how to improve and promote the programme. There were also some reservations about the organisation of placements and of mentorship arrangements, the latter largely due to the difficulty of arranging for time for returnees and their mentors to work together.

Recommendations: RTP programmes should be continued and if possible expanded. Wider advertising, ideally involving successful RTP returnees, should be used to attract more recruits, and funding for returnees should be maintained or increased.
Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) should offer support to enable RTP nurses to return to study and to achieve their academic objectives as smoothly as possible. This may include responding to the individual learning needs of RTP nurses and allowing flexibility for students who need longer for private study. National Health Service (NHS) Trusts/Boards should ensure that Human Resource (HR) departments are willing and able to deal quickly with arrangements for employed RTP students. Processes for arranging placements should include realistic timetables for Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks to be carried out. NHS providers should consider the suggestion that returnees can arrange their own placements if they wish.

NHS providers should make even greater efforts to ensure that front-line staff understand the position of RTP nursing students, what they can expect from them and what their responsibilities to them are.

Recent RTP graduates should be encouraged and enabled to support future RTP students. As champions of the programme, they should support the Trust in clarifying to existing staff what RTP students need and can be permitted to do.

Year2019
PublisherCity, University of London
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.2.24392.67841
File
License
File Access Level
Open
Publication dates
Print03 Jul 2019
Publication process dates
Deposited30 Mar 2023
Publisher's version
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/93792

Download files


File
RTPReportFinal03July2019.pdf
License: CC BY 4.0
File access level: Open

  • 45
    total views
  • 15
    total downloads
  • 0
    views this month
  • 0
    downloads this month

Export as

Related outputs

Addressing the mental health needs of looked after children in foster care: the experiences of foster carers
Jones, J. and York, W. (2017). Addressing the mental health needs of looked after children in foster care: the experiences of foster carers. Journal of psychiatric and mental health nursing. 24, pp. 143-153. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12362