Serious youth violence: County lines drug dealing and the Government response

Project report


Havard, T. (2022). Serious youth violence: County lines drug dealing and the Government response. House of Commons Library.
AuthorsHavard, T.
TypeProject report
Abstract

This briefing focuses on serious youth violence within the context of organised crime groups involved in county lines drug dealing. The Government has made “rolling up county lines” a priority for the police in recent years.

Year2022
PublisherHouse of Commons Library
Web address (URL)https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-9264/CBP-9264.pdf
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Publication dates
Print04 Feb 2022
Publication process dates
Deposited10 Mar 2022
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/8z79q

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