The impact of participating in suicide research online.

Journal article


Gibson, S, Boden, Z., Benson, O and Brand, SL (2014). The impact of participating in suicide research online. Suicide and Life -Threatening Behavior. 44 (4), pp. 372-383.
AuthorsGibson, S, Boden, Z., Benson, O and Brand, SL
Abstract

The impact of participation in online mixed-methods suicide research was investigated. Participants, who described feeling suicidal, completed an 18-item questionnaire before and after taking part (n = 103), and answered open-ended questions about participation (n = 97). Overall, participation reduced negative experiences and had no effect on positive experiences. Feelings of calm increased, but participants felt less supported. Some participants did experience distress, but some also reported this distress to be manageable. Anonymously sharing experiences of suicidality was viewed as important, had therapeutic benefits, and engendered hopes for recovery. The findings suggest a need to ensure vulnerable participants in online studies are well supported while protecting their anonymity.

KeywordsHumans; Questionnaires; Suicide; Emotions; Anxiety; Research; Social Support; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Middle Aged; Research Subjects; Female; Male; Young Adult; Suicidal Ideation; Hope; Adolescent; Adult; Aged; Anxiety; Emotions; Female; Hope; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Research; Research Subjects; Social Support; Suicidal Ideation; Suicide; Surveys and Questionnaires; Young Adult
Year2014
JournalSuicide and Life -Threatening Behavior
Journal citation44 (4), pp. 372-383
PublisherLondon South Bank University
ISSN1943-278X
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/sltb.12082
Publication dates
Print15 Feb 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited14 Dec 2017
Accepted17 Sep 2013
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/87871

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