Empathy predicts false belief reasoning ability: evidence from the N400.

Journal article


Ferguson, HJ, Cane, JE, Douchkov, M and Wright, D (2014). Empathy predicts false belief reasoning ability: evidence from the N400. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. 10 (6), pp. 848 - 855.
AuthorsFerguson, HJ, Cane, JE, Douchkov, M and Wright, D
Abstract

Interpreting others' actions relies on an understanding of their current mental state. Emerging research has begun to identify a number of factors that give rise to individual differences in this ability. We report an event-related brain potential study where participants (N = 28) read contexts that described a character having a true belief (TB) or false belief (FB) about an object's location. A second sentence described where that character would look for the object. Critically, this sentence included a sentence-final noun that was either consistent or inconsistent with the character's belief. Participants also completed the Empathy Quotient questionnaire. Analysis of the N400 revealed that when the character held a TB about the object's location, the N400 waveform was more negative-going for belief inconsistent vs belief consistent critical words. However, when the character held an FB about the object's location the opposite pattern was found. Intriguingly, correlations between the N400 inconsistency effect and individuals' empathy scores showed a significant correlation for FB but not TB. This suggests that people who are high in empathy can successfully interpret events according to the character's FB, while low empathizers bias their interpretation of events to their own egocentric view.

Year2014
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Journal citation10 (6), pp. 848 - 855
PublisherOxford University Press
ISSN1749-5016
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1093/scan/nsu131
Publication dates
Print08 Nov 2014
Publication process dates
Deposited12 Apr 2017
Accepted14 Oct 2014
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/87767

Accepted author manuscript

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