True or false memory? Evidence that naïve observers have difficulty identifying false memories of emotional events, especially for audio-only accounts.

Conference item


Shaw, J (2015). True or false memory? Evidence that naïve observers have difficulty identifying false memories of emotional events, especially for audio-only accounts. The annual meeting of the Society for Applied Research on Memory and Cognition. Victoria, Canada. 24 - 27 Jun 2015 London South Bank University.
AuthorsShaw, J
Abstract

Two studies examined whether naïve observers could differentiate between accounts by individuals describing rich true and false memories of emotional and criminal events. To test the potential role of cognitive load on accuracy, observers were either provided regular videos, muted videos, or audio-only accounts. In all video conditions participants only scored minimally different from the level of chance at identifying false memories. In the audio-only condition, accuracy was significantly impaired. Comparative evaluations were overall less accurate than absolute judgments, and self-reported cues used to make evaluations proved uninformative. Implications for memory researchers and legal scholars are discussed.

Keywordsfalse memory, interviewing, interrogation, confession
Year2015
PublisherLondon South Bank University
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Publication dates
Print24 Jun 2015
Publication process dates
Deposited12 Dec 2016
Accepted24 Jun 2015
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/87684

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