Understanding the terminologies: Disaster, crisis and emergency

Conference item


Al-Dahash, H, Thayaparan, M and Kulatunga, U (2016). Understanding the terminologies: Disaster, crisis and emergency. Association of Researchers in Construction Management (ARCOM). Manchester 05 - 07 Sep 2016 London South Bank University. pp. 1191-1200
AuthorsAl-Dahash, H, Thayaparan, M and Kulatunga, U
Abstract

Despite the fact that there is a difference between the terms disaster, crisis and emergency, they are closely interconnected, interdependent and overlap significantly. With a blurred line between the definitions of these terms, the mainstream literature uses the terms disaster, crisis and emergency interchangeably and in combination such as 'disaster crisis management' and 'crisis and emergency management'. The aim of this article is to systematically and critically review the arguments and counterarguments about the definitions of disaster, crisis, and emergency to date. A comprehensive literature review in the relevant field has been conducted in order to improve understanding of these phenomena. A qualitative conceptual content analysis has been carried out to establish the differences and similarities between disaster, crisis and emergency. The analysis reveals that the sudden nature of the event and the damage caused are the common features of all three terms, though emergency is not always of a sudden nature. Further, many common features have been identified between disaster and crisis, so that they can be used interchangeably up to a certain extent. The term emergency does not share many common features with the other two terms and has some contradictory features. Also, the authors conclude that both crisis and emergency would lead to disaster if the event were neglected or mismanaged.

Year2016
JournalProceedings of the 32nd Annual ARCOM Conference, ARCOM 2016
PublisherLondon South Bank University
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
Publication dates
Print05 Aug 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited15 Aug 2017
Accepted10 Aug 2016
Page range1191-1200
Permalink -

https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/872x5

  • 60
    total views
  • 57
    total downloads
  • 11
    views this month
  • 7
    downloads this month

Related outputs

Challenges during disaster response planning resulting from war operations and terrorism in Iraq
Al-Dahash, H, Thayaparan, M and Kulatunga, U (2016). Challenges during disaster response planning resulting from war operations and terrorism in Iraq. 12th International conference of the International Institute for Infrastructure Resilience and Reconstruction. Kandy, Sri Lanka 05 - 07 Aug 2016 London South Bank University.
A Resilience Framework for Critical Infrastructure
Thayaparan, M, Ingirige, B, Pathirage, C, Kulatunga, U and Fernando, T (2016). A Resilience Framework for Critical Infrastructure. 12th International conference of the International Institute for Infrastructure Resilience and Reconstruction. Kandy, Sri Lanka 05 - 07 Aug 2016 London South Bank University.
Vulnerability Assessment for Climate-Induced Disasters in Malaysia.
Kulatunga, U, Pathirage, C, Thayaparan, M and Sulaiman, N (2016). Vulnerability Assessment for Climate-Induced Disasters in Malaysia. International Conference on Sustainable Built Environment. Kandy, Sri Lanka 16 - 19 Dec 2016 London South Bank University.
Malaysian experience with public-private partnership (PPP): Managing unsolicited proposal
Zin Zawawi, MI, Kulatunga, U and Thayaparan, M (2016). Malaysian experience with public-private partnership (PPP): Managing unsolicited proposal. Built Environment Project and Asset Management. 6 (5), pp. 508-520.