Image interpretation performance: A longitudinal study from novice to professional

Journal article


Wright, C and Reeves, P (2016). Image interpretation performance: A longitudinal study from novice to professional. Radiography. 23 (1), pp. e1-e7.
AuthorsWright, C and Reeves, P
Abstract

Purpose: Universities need to deliver educational programmes that create radiography graduates who are ready and able to participate in abnormality detection schemes, ultimately delivering safe and reliable performance because junior doctors are exposed to the risk of misdiagnosis if unsupported by other healthcare professionals. Radiographers are ideally suited to this role having the responsibility for conducting the actual X-ray examination. Method: The image interpretation performance of one cohort of student radiographers was measured upon enrolment from UCAS in the first week of university education and then again prior to graduation using RadBench (n ¼ 23). Results: The results identified that novices have a range of natural image interpretation skills; accuracy 35e85%, sensitivity 45e100%, specificity 15e85%, mean ROC 0.691. Graduates presented a narrower range; accuracy 60e90%, sensitivity 40e100%, specificity 60e90%, mean ROC 0.841. The positive shift in graduate mean accuracy (þ16%) was driven by increases in specificity (þ27%) rather than sensitivity (þ5%). No statistically significant differences (ANOVA) could be found between age group, gender and previous education however trends were identified. 56.5% of the population (n ¼ 13) met a benchmark accurate standard of 80%, including one graduate who met 90%. Conclusion: Image interpretation testing at the point of UCAS entry is a useful indicator of future performance and is a recommended factor for consideration as part of the selection process. Whilst image interpretation now forms an integral part of undergraduate radiography programmes, new graduates may not necessary possess the reliability in decision making to justify participation in abnormality detection schemes, highlighting the need for continuous professional development.

KeywordsRadBench; Image Interpretation; Red Dot; Radiographer; PCE; Clinical Governance
Year2016
JournalRadiography
Journal citation23 (1), pp. e1-e7
PublisherW. B. Saunders Co., Ltd.
ISSN1078-8174
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1016/j.radi.2016.08.006
Publication dates
Print31 Aug 2016
Publication process dates
Deposited19 Dec 2016
Accepted17 Aug 2016
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/87292

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