In Praise of a Self-Contained Regime: Why the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations Remains Important Today

Book chapter


Barker, JC. (2017). In Praise of a Self-Contained Regime: Why the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations Remains Important Today. in: Behrens, P (ed.) Diplomatic Law in a New Millennium Oxford Oxford University Press. pp. 23-42
AuthorsBarker, JC.
EditorsBehrens, P
Abstract

This chapter is dedicated to the challenges which the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, fifty years into its existence, faces in a world marked by a globalised economy and rapid technological developments. The author reflects on new diplomatic processes which have emerged through the creation of governmental and non-governmental institutions and on notions such as collaborative, public and cultural diplomacy which have challenged accepted understandings of the role and functions of traditional diplomacy. Barker also explores the fact that international law itself is changing from a system regulating co-existing sovereignties to a possibly fragmented discourse of complex frameworks which themselves challenge the sovereignty paradigm. In this context, he investigates the continued relevance and purpose of the VCDR and gives particular focus to existing mechanisms within the Convention that allow for modified and developed interpretations of the Convention to take account of the changing international world in which contemporary diplomacy operates.

KeywordsPrivileges and immunities; abuse; sovereignty; human rights; globalisation
Page range23-42
Year2017
Book titleDiplomatic Law in a New Millennium
PublisherOxford University Press
Place of publicationOxford
Edition1
ISBN9780198795940
Publication dates
Print13 Jul 2017
Publication process dates
Deposited02 Mar 2017
Accepted01 Jan 2017
Web address (URL)https://global.oup.com/academic/product/diplomatic-law-in-a-new-millennium-9780198795940?q=978-0198795940&lang=en&cc=gb
Accepted author manuscript
License
CC BY 4.0
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https://openresearch.lsbu.ac.uk/item/86y96

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